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Dog Bite Statistics

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Aggressive dogs playingNote: This article is based on third-party statistics. It does not necessarily represent the opinions of this website.

According to the Center For Disease Control (CDC), approximately 4.5 million dog bites occur in the United States every year, and 900,000 of those bites become infected. The U.S. population is approximately 325.8 million people as of 2017. That means a dog bites 1 out of every 72 people.

These are scary statistics. But scary becomes a lot less so when you’re armed with the right information. From the top breeds to be wary of, to accounting for your own behavior around animals, to why dogs actually bite in the first place, we’re giving you an arsenal of information in this article so you can bite back in the dog bite debate.

Why Do Dogs Bite?

Before we start profiling dogs or analyzing your behavior around them, let’s talk about the question everyone should first be asking: why does a dog bite?

  • Dogs bite as a reaction to a stressful situation.
  • They may be scared or threatened.
  • To protect themselves, their puppies, or their owners.
  • They’re not feeling well or if they’re startled.
  • They may nip or bite during play (which is why rough play should be avoided to ensure you don’t overly excite your animal).

Keep these triggers in mind anytime you’re around a canine. Your awareness of their mental state will help you recognize a potential bite situation more quickly.

Dog Bite Statistics

  • Approximately 4.5 million dog bites occur each year
  • In 2016, there were an estimated 78 million dogs in the U.S.
  • In 2016, there were 41 U.S. dog bite-related fatalities, which means 0.00000053% of dogs caused fatalities
    • Pit bulls contributed to 22 of these deaths
    • Labradors contributed to 3 deaths
    • Rottweilers, American Bulldogs, Belgian Malinois, Doberman Pinschers, German Shepherds and mixed-breeds each contributed to 2 deaths
    • 31% of deaths were infants ages 3 to 6 days
    • 42% (13) of deaths were children ages 9 and younger
    • 58% (18) of deaths were adults ages 30 and older
  • Pit bulls and Rottweilers accounted for 76% of fatal attacks from 2005 to 2016
  • You have a 1 in 112,400 chance of dying from a dog bite or strike
    • You are at more risk of dying from:
      • Cataclysmic storm: 1 in 66,335
      • Contact with hornets, wasps and bees: 1 in 63,225
      • Air and space transport incidents: 1 in 9,821
      • Firearm discharge: 1 in 6,905
      • Choking from inhalation and ingestion of food: 1 in 3,461
      • Heart disease and cancer: 1 in 7
  • Most dog bites involve dogs who are not spayed or neutered
  • Fatal Dog Attacks states that 25% of fatal attacks were inflicted by chained dogs of many different breeds
  • The insurance industry paid more than $530 million in dog bite related claims in 2014

The video below discusses more dog bite statistics.

Be Mindful of Breeds, But Not Fearful

You’ve likely heard of the Pit Bull breed, touted as the breed most responsible for dog bites. But you can dismantle much of your fear of them with our Pit Bull Facts article. Unfortunately, Pit Bulls account for the majority of reported fatal attacks in the United States. While there’s no denying that one should be more vigilant around a large dog than say, a Cocker Spaniel, there’s also no denying that an animal is part product of its environment. Remember that any dog can bite, no matter how well-trained it may be. Many popular family dogs have caused fatalities including Labradors and German Shepherds. So it is always a good idea to be a responsible dog owner and make sure pets are supervised at all times with others.

What Breeds Have the Strongest Bite?

Below are the top 10 dogs with the strongest bite in terms of PSI (pound per square inch or pound-force per square inch).

  1. Kangal: 743 PSI
  2. Doberman: 600 PSI
  3. English Mastiff: 556 PSI
  4. Rottweiler: 328 PSI
  5. African Wild Dog: 317 PSI
  6. American Bull Dog: 305 PSI
  7. German Shepherd: 238 PSI
  8. American Pitbull: 235 PSI
  9. Dutch Shepherd: 224 PSI
  10. Malinois: 195 PSI

How to Protect Yourself Against the Risk of Dog Bites

Dog liability insurance is a special policy that you can get to insure yourself in case you have what a landlord or other important person in your life might consider a “dangerous dog breed.” If you have one of these dogs, you most certainly know it as some people are probably a little scared of your pup. It is unlikely that they need to be, but better safe than sorry in case a situation ever were to arise where your dog bit someone. Why? Because with liability insurance you would merely file a claim and it would cover the cost of the situation. In many cases, we have heard of dogs’ lives being saved by the ability to cover these sorts of incidents by proactively seeking insurance rather than reacting after a bad situation occurs. Better safe than sorry, right?

According to the Insurance Information Institute, one-third of all homeowner’s insurance liability claims (in dollars) result from dog bites or dog-related injuries, and the average cost is more than $37,000.

InsureMyCanine logoIf you are interested in protecting yourself with dog liability insurance, visit our partner at InsureMyCanine.com to learn more and get a free quote.

Decreasing Your Chances of a Dog Bite Attack

While we’re not absolving the canine completely of its own responsibility in a dog-bite situation, there are always two sides to a story — even a bad one. When it comes to your side, there are more than two things that you can do to decrease your chances of an attack.

Things to Consider Before Getting a Dog

There are a few key things to consider before bringing a new dog into your home, especially if you already have other animals or children. Below are a few factors that, if considered, can help decrease your chances of an unwarranted attack before an animal ever walks through your front door.

  • Dogs with a history of aggression are not appropriate for a home with children. Period.
  • Before choosing a dog, research and consult with a professional (a trusted vet or dog trainer would be an excellent resource) to find the best breed for your needs.
  • Proper socialization and training for your pup is key.
  • Spend time with your prospective pet before adopting to ascertain aggressive tendencies.
  • Spay or neuter your animal to reduce aggressive tendencies before bringing them home.

How to Prevent a Dog Bite

Just like people, there are always good pets that snap. Even though the dog never displayed any aggressive attitudes, even though you didn’t provoke him to attack, there are still those unaccountable instances that no one can explain or rationalize. However, more often than not, this isn’t the case. That’s why, when dealing with any dog, you should maintain confident, but cautious body-language. Below are a few things you can do to make sure your attitude doesn’t trigger an attack.

  • Don’t approach an unfamiliar animal.
  • Do not run from a dog, panic or make loud noises.
  • If an unfamiliar dog approaches you, remain motionless. Do not run or scream. Avoid direct eye contact.
  • Don’t disturb a dog while they’re eating, sleeping, or taking care of their puppies.
  • Allow a dog to sniff and smell you before you attempt to pet it. Afterward scratch the animal under the chin, not on the head.
  • Report strays or dogs displaying strange behavior to your local animal control.
  • If knocked over by a dog, roll into a ball and remain motionless. Be sure to cover your ears and neck with your hands and arms. Avoid eye contact and remain calm.
  • Don’t encourage your dog to play aggressively.

Dog Bite Statistics Infographic

Dog Bite Statistics Infographic

To embed this infographic on your site, simply copy and paste this code:

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Disclaimer: Information regarding insurance company offerings, pricing and other contract details are subject to change by the insurance company at any time and are not under the control of this website. Information published on this website is intended for reference use only. Please review your policy carefully before signing up for a new pet health insurance contract or any other contract as your unique circumstances will differ from those of others who may be used for example purposes in this article.

Sara is a writer for Canine Journal. She adores dogs and recently adopted a rescue pup named Beamer. Whole she may be adjusting to life with another being to care for, she needed no time to adjust to all the extra love.

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82 Comments on "Dog Bite Statistics"

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Kelsey
Kelsey

Just curious why African Wild Dogs are on there. And not hyenas or wolves?

Kimberly Alt
Admin
Kimberly Alt

Hi Kelsey, great question. The source we sited is for the top 10 dogs. From reading the source, it seems like it is ranking the top 10 dogs that live with people. People don’t have too many hyenas and wolves in their homes. Hope that explains it! 🙂

Megab
Megab

Hi, Hyena’s are actually not related to dogs they are considered more feline.

Hannah
Hannah
Okay so I don’t proclaim to know much about Pitbulls as I have never owned one. There where quite a few where I live and some loose. I had run ins with some. Most of the fights were provoked by my dog a lab cross. Luckily the fights were not too hard to break up. I study dogs and dog breeds in my spare time. I have noticed that mastiff type dogs are less likely to maul people. Why is this? I think it could be that mastiffs are understood more. People realize what those dogs are capable off and… Read more »
Eddie Carroll
Eddie Carroll

I also like how in the midst of the article there is an ad for Dog Bite Insurance. Gee, I wonder why that ad is there… maybe because the article has now gotten you afraid of pitbulls, so you’d better go get their insurance to protect yourself.

This reads like a sales ad for the insurance company more than an objective look into dog bites. Mark Twain once said “There are three kinds of lies: ‘A lie’, ‘A damn lie and a statistic.”

Kimberly Alt
Admin
Kimberly Alt

People who are concerned with dog bites or who have “aggressive dog breeds” may not be aware of liability insurance and it is the best way to protect ones’ self financially. This is a free site with original content about dogs because we love dogs and want to share what we have learned over the years with other responsible dog owners. Ads and partnerships are how we are able to produce the free content you are reading.

zodiac
zodiac

pits were bread to fight , not be companions . hell my wolf dog is less likely to bite than my sisters pits . my dog just gets excited about other doggos and wants to play . hers have litterally jumped out of their home window ran the neighbors dog down and attacked her .

A Andrews
A Andrews
Being raised around all large breeds specifically pits and having neighbors with half wolf dogs. Half wolf dogs are more likely to bite. By nature they know no bounds so you have to know the nature of the wild to protect yourself. My friend also adopts half wolf breeds all the time and I’ve been nipped just by them protecting their own space. I knew it was just an instinct, you can’t have thin skin and cry about not respecting a breed. My parents have adopted every large breed said to be “aggressive” and me and my siblings have never… Read more »
john zolis
john zolis

Anecdotal comments have zero weight in debate!
Furthermore M.Vicks dogs were bred, trained and fought and after they were rescued 49 of 51 of the dogs went on to homes and became good canine award holders and therapy dogs so take your rhetoric about Pits are not companions you closed minded bigot!

Rachel
Rachel

“Pit bulls” which is a TYPE not a specific breed, were bred (not bread – they are animals, not food), to be protectors of children. They were bred to be loyal and gentle to all and had nothing to do with fighting. Unfortunately, due to their loyalty, humans used this to their advantage in order to selectively breed a few for “sports”. This trait however, is not an innate behaviour and if raised for a family pet they thrive. If raised with little discipline, the fear creates an uneasy environment, as with any breed.

STATS R HARD
STATS R HARD

US population is not in the billions.

Kimberly Alt
Admin
Kimberly Alt

Whoops, sorry about that typo 😉 It is corrected now! Thanks for bringing it to our attention.

Juan
Juan

I’m not smart man but I know 22 is not 71% of 41

Kimberly Alt
Admin
Kimberly Alt

Sorry about the confusion. Originally in the article we found the figures from it says there were 31 dog bite-related fatalities in 2016 and 22 of them were from pit bulls. Then later it says, “In 2016, eight fatalities involved dogs from two or more different breeds, thus producing a “death credit” total of 41 rather than 31.” This is a bit confusing so we removed the percentage next to pit bulls. Thanks for bringing this to our attention.

Pitbull_panic_run!!
Pitbull_panic_run!!

Stats seem to be the last thing the writer was thinking about when writing this article yet it was named “dog bite statistics” As far as I can remember labradors are the biggest (registered) biters (stats don’t lie! Look it up).

To all the pitbull haters: even I would like to bite you ignorant morons, almost every dog bite can be attributed to irresponsible owners. It barely has anything to do with the breed at all (every dog has a prey drive), when small dogs bite its usually considered “cute”… Stop discriminating!

Victoria
Victoria
Another reason dogs bite: simply to kill. Why not mention this? In the past two weeks our small community has seen three separate unprovoked pit bull attacks (these are just the ones reported by the victims on our local neighborhood website). Two of the attacks happened one week ago today. These were three separate incidents (one pit bull was brown and white, another young and gray, another had three legs- accompanied by people of different descriptions from one another) In all three incidents, the pit bull charged from a distance of approx 50 yards to attack and kill: 2 small… Read more »
Bob
I dd enjoy this article it is well written but is seems to paint a picture that all dogs are dangers waiting to happen and I do not agree with that. Personally from living with dogs as long as i can remember I do not agree with heightening laws on dogs and forcing people to take them to obedience training if they are “more than 30 pounds”. In my experience little dogs are the worst behaved because when a tiny dog jumps on you people say oh how cute how cute. I have been bitten on my ankles by little… Read more »
Lori Ann Reese
Lori Ann Reese
All dogs are dangerous. Golden Retrievers are statistically almost as likely to bite as other dogs. People need to 1) Spay and neuter to reduce hostility 2) Be required by insurance companies to attend at least level 1 of dog obedience for dogs more than thirty pounds in weight. 3) Understanding that chaining a dog in the back yard is the same as deliberately creating a possible serial killer; they are unsocialized, unhappy, isolated and frequently mentally unbalanced from the horrible life chained up. If you have to chain your dog, rehome it… you are not a responsible pet owner.… Read more »
Kimberly Altman
Kimberly Altman

Seriously..?? Over thirty pounds..ive been chased n bit by poodles n Chihuahuas! Little dogs where the owners did not control the yapping monsters..my 50 lb precious princess pitt is a darling..i raised her from a pup putting my hand in n out of her food bowl..she has no aggressions and is always on a leash outside my fenced yard..even walking to the car..as all dogs..no matter size..should be..because like ALL canines they are indeed animals..its their nature ..a responsible owner makes the best dog.plain and simple

Drema Fowler
Drema Fowler
I read many articles on dog bites. I post regularly. I read “insights” on all dogs bite, they say–‘there are more things that harm a child more than pitbulls such as marbles, car accidents, or choking on food”. When a pitbull bites, it is not a part of normal life. As to say- whoops my dog accidentally killed this child. These dogs should not be in a home with children, in a neighborhood with children, elderly or anyone. They are like a down power line waiting to strike. I can not tell you how many news articles or postings I… Read more »
Kimberly Altman
Kimberly Altman

GOTTA GIVE YOU A BIG…WRONG.a friend of mine had half his face bit off by a Chihuahua mix..he had to be put down years laterl the other family dog..an all american pitbull terrier had never once growled at anyone.

Victoria
Victoria

Your post is completely logical. It seems that this site is for pit bull advocates.

Destinee VanHorn
Destinee VanHorn
You have no absolute right to talk about pit bulls like that. Have you ever owned one? No. Have you ever seen a pit bull attack someone? No. Most people who claim to be bitten by a pit bull is lying because they don’t know the breed and it’s easier to pin the crime on a “well known biter” than to just say it was a dog. I have been around pit bulls all my life they came from bad situations. Ginger (one of my dogs) was a former champion fighting dog and yes she is a pit but she… Read more »
Luigi
Luigi
“No right?” Where are we Russia? North Korea? Your argument is a joke and does not follow logic. I don’t have to own a cobra to know that just having it around me is dangerous. Fact: Pit Bull Terriers are responsible for more deaths and more attacks that ALL OTHER BREEDS COMBINED. Only an idiot would put a former “fighting dog” around children and only a fool would choose a breed with the potential to hurt humans around their family and especially children. If you were walking in an alley at night and came up against three pit bulls you… Read more »
Eddie Carroll
Eddie Carroll
Just to be clear – Pitties are a category of breed, not a breed itself. The stats that say Pit Bull Terrier are wrong. There is no “pit bull terrier”. There is an American Bull Terrier, but most of these “pit bulls” are a combination of breeds and anything that remotely resembles one is labeled as a Pit Bull. Even this article calls them Pit Bull Terriers. Therefore to say that Pit Bulls are responsible for 22 deaths is probably inaccurate because eyewitnesses often misidentify dog breeds and if it’s close, they just call it a Pit Bull. Owners are… Read more »
Kimberly Altman
Kimberly Altman

Id rather come across the pitbulls..ur moronic!

Drema Fowler
Drema Fowler

As we sit here, a toddler was mauled over the weekend by pit mixes, a couple months back a family pit bull attack and killed a 3 day old infant simply from crying, do you hear of retrievers, or even Rottweilers, doing this damage? These dogs are dangerous.

Gigi
Gigi
Yes I have heard of those dogs attacking. And, yes they can do as much damage. I am an instructor of Dog Aggression. Socialization, spay and nueter is a must. Chaining creates a monster. And allowing young children and toddlers to “play” with any large breed dog is a recipe for disaster! My Grandchildren never allowed to “play” with any dog. They are taught to respectfully give all dogs space. They are taught to not make eye contact or approach any strange dog. They are taught to let the dog approach them if it wants to. People expect dogs to… Read more »
Michael Fargo
Michael Fargo
I think a good place to start this discussion is “yes, the general population is ignorant about dog behavior.” So, if that’s the case, why bring an animal that can cause lethal damage into that situation? There are many people in the population that don’t like dogs and they have that right. They have no obligation to learn about “dog body language” (or be killed or mauled). It’s the owner’s responsibility–entirely–to make sure the public or his family is protected from an animal. Owners who believe that their pet is a product of their environment are ignoring the obvious: certain… Read more »
Kimberly Altman
Kimberly Altman

All you idiots are really making me so angry ..any freakn animal can growl..bite ..or attack..not my all american pitty would bite you..BUT I SURE AS HELL WOULD!

Sara Brown
Sara Brown
My childhood pastor’s 1 year old was attacked by their Labrador. They had him for years before they had children. My dog Oscar ( pitbull) loved all children ( and cats too) He was always super gentle and calm when a kid was around even though he was a very hyper active. I miss him every day. He was my very favorite dog. A little girl was on the beach, crying because her sandcastle had washed away. Oscar ran up behind her, gave her a giant lick on the head and continued on his way happy as can be. The… Read more »
cheshire572
cheshire572

Did you know that home owner liability claims are only 2.7% of total claims? How it is stated makes all the difference. That bites correlated to population is 0.005% Did you know there were 66,000 unintended accidental deaths and 19,900,000 medical consulted injuries? With 77.8 million dogs in the US I would have to say pretty good safety record compared to humans.

cheshire572
cheshire572

Insurance industry does not support that claim of 1 billion. I know of no study that shows definitely about the type of dog involved in bites. Dog bite claims accounted for 0.005 percent of the population. Three time more likely to be hurt on a bicycle. Please don’t misrepresent this issue.

Kimberly Alt
Kimberly Alt

Thank you for your comment. We sourced all of our resources in the article. We did not come up with these numbers on our own. We are sorry if you feel we are misrepresenting the issue. We are all huge dog lovers here at Canine Journal and we want pet parents to know the facts about dog bites. That is all we tried to do with this article.

cheshire572
cheshire572

Then provide the facts not just posting a poorly written article that accepts Insurance company statements without putting them in context. The statement one third of homeowner liability claims is true but disingenuous. My stats are from the Insurance Industry Institute.

kimboley
kimboley

There is a web site, by Allstate insurance, if you enter your zip code, or any zip code, it will tell you what the most expensive and the most common claims for that area are. Dog bites, barely made the list, of the more than 10 zip codes I entered. They are far from being 1/3 of liability claims, as far as Allstate claims. I think the insurance companies are just looking for a way to save money. Here is the link, check it out yourselves. https://www.allstate.com/anon/commoncostlyclaims/#

Kim B
Kim B
“Studies confirm that while Pit Bulls may be considered a higher-risk dog, most of their owners themselves are higher-risk people, thus creating a recipe for a dog-bite disaster.” Please provide info on these “studies”. I believe, based on facts (myself and several hundred other people I know who are owners), that this statement is false. It is ridiculous and it perpetuates myths about this breed type. The “pit bull” might be considered “higher-risk” by people who believe everything they read in the media (ignorant) and who don’t know how to properly act and/or approach dogs, but that doesn’t make it… Read more »
Kimberly Altman
Kimberly Altman

FINALLY…..I SO AGREE WITH YOU..thank you from me and my darling people..child kittycat..guinea pig loving all American pitt bull terrier

Kimberly Alt
Kimberly Alt

Hi Kim, so glad that you enjoy our website and thank you for your comment! Attached are the sources where the “high risk” information comes from. We did not make this up, it is information we found so we chose to share with our readers. I believe by “high risk” the author means that pitbull owners are more likely to have a criminal background and may display antisocial behaviors. However this isn’t true 100% of the time. We love pitbulls and think they’re great dogs. 🙂

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1556-4029.2009.01001.x/abstract
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1556-4029.2011.01961.x/abstract
http://jiv.sagepub.com/content/21/12/1616

cheshire572
cheshire572

754 college students? I will stick with CDC, Humane Society and AMVA. While I may agree the some bites are attributable to bad owners not everyone that has a dog that bites is a criminal and or deviant behavior as your links suggest.

Victoria
Victoria
The purpose of these articles appears to be analyzing psychopathic behavior potential in humans (college students as the survey subjects). It is not geared toward analyzing dog breeds and is not an appropriate resource to cite for the Canine Journal story. The website of the first two cited sources is devoted to forensic science, i.e., scientifically analyzing criminals (human), crime scenes, etc. The last cited article also pertains to human on human violence, and whether ownership of high risk breeds is linked to deviant (human) behavior. I’m a new visitor to the Canine Journal website, and I’d deduce that CJ… Read more »
Kimberly Alt
Kimberly Alt

We agree with you, “not everyone that has a dog that bites is a criminal and or deviant behavior”. We know that there are great pet parents out there as well as not so great pet parents. As stated in our previous comment, we merely found this information and decided to share it with our readers.

kimboley kay
kimboley kay
But the wording your writer used to share this information implied something far different then what is really happening in the world. Most dog owners in general have to be responsible people. And when you own a breed that is hated and restricted, you have to be even more responsible. Hundreds and hundreds of thousands of people own these dogs all across the country. Hundreds of thousands are abused by not responsible dog owners and sick mean people, these dogs have certainly earned the right to bite and yet they bite no one. You don’t hear about these dogs in… Read more »
cheshire572
cheshire572

Neither science nor statistics support policies that discriminate based on breed or physical appearance. What the Humane Society states: http://www.humanesociety.org/issues/breed-specific-legislation/fact_sheets/breed-specific-legislation-no-basis-in-science.html?referrer=https://www.google.com/

Kim B
Kim B
Thank you for your response. I do appreciate it. However, I firmly stand by my belief that the statistics are ridiculous and I believe it is irresponsible to make the statements I referred to in my original post. The first study cited is dated 2009 and is based on: “A total of 869 college students completed an anonymous online questionnaire assessing type of dog owned, criminal behaviors, attitudes towards animal abuse, psychopathy, and personality.” Really?! Not very inidicative of the real and “complete” world we live in and definitely not based on our knowledge now in 2016. Do you really… Read more »
Kimberly Alt
Kimberly Alt
Thank you for respectfully sharing your thoughts. This article was originally written in 2013 and the author who wrote this article uses the word “studies” so there could be some articles that she looked at that I did not give you. She no longer writes for us and to be honest, it’s difficult to remember your sources as a writer after 3 years have passed 😉 . Along with the 869 college student study you mentioned, there’s another study of 355 people that I’m aware of, which is one of the resources linked. Granted, both of these studies are now… Read more »
cheshire572
cheshire572
Insurance Company Institute shows 16,500 dog bite claims in the same period where your quoted study states 4.5 million without a source. Please don’t just post click bait articles. If as you state you don’t conduct your own studies perhaps you could at least verify what you do post. I am not trying to attack you specifically but there are so many articles like this one that keep getting repeated when they are at best questionable. It is only because I love my dog. The extensive studies that have been done all state that it should be on a dog… Read more »
Kim B
Kim B

I found some great resources on my lunch hour today…wish I could attached files here. Check out the Animals and Society Institute website, specifically, their study “Dog Bites: Problems and Solutions (Revised 2014). Also, at the end of this study is a long list of resources. I hope you don’t mind this info, but I found it and wanted to share!! Thanks, Kim

Kimberly Alt
Kimberly Alt

Thanks for sharing the information Kim! We will take a look at it! 🙂

Kim B
Kim B
Thank you, Kimberly. I mean no disrespect either. I am simply urging and encouraging serious review/editing of comments regarding pitties. I believe your publication means well from what I’ve seen, but that’s not enough. I am just asking for deeper, newer research (I know you don’t do your own studies!). But, thorough research of current events, owners, and the animals themselves will elimate statements that are out-dated or simply not indicitive of the majority. And it doesn’t take days and days to do that research. That’s all I ask. I think that’s fair. Thanks for your time and patience. I… Read more »
Wayne Frederick
Wayne Frederick
Just came across this site after reading an article about a pit bull attack on a small child. I read your posts. You blew right past the fact that the article wasn’t about Pit Bulls and instead zeroed in on just that small part. Your comments come across loud and clear as the typical response from folks such as yourself. It yells out “I’m a Pit Bull owner and my friends own Pit Bulls. We say they’re fine. Everyone else is wrong.” You question the author, her work, and the validity of statistical results and polls from multiple legitimate sources,… Read more »
Kim B
Kim B
No, I’m not not saying I am right and everyone else is wrong! And, no, not all of my friends own pit bulls…actually, only one of them does. I am saying to research the facts. The facts are pit bull type dogs are no more dangerous than any other dog. Fact: they are mis-identified over 90% of the time because it is FACT that correct visual ID is impossible. I could go on and on with the FACTS. Like, I am not saying it’s okay to believe me. My dog has been attacked by a “pit bull” and my kid… Read more »
Wayne Frederick
Wayne Frederick

I didn’t miss that point at all. But we’re not talking about ALL dogs, are we? We’re talking about Pit Bulls. Stay on topic. If you’re going to claim everyone research the facts then you need to do the same. It is NOT a fact that Pit Bulls are no more dangerous than any other dog. That’s a ridiculous statement. They’re considered dangerous dogs for a reason, and the reasons are real and valid. I can’t help that you either don’t get that or won’t get it. The final word is yours but I’m moving on.

Shelly
Shelly
Well Wayne, since according to you only the breeds you listed are dangerous, you are seriously ok with your children or grandchildren being around any other breed of dog unsupervised? You would be ok with them approaching and petting an unknown random dog on the street as long as it’s any other breed? Common sense should tell you to “watch them like a hawk” no matter what type of dog it is. Of course, like what many anti-pit bull people will say on any subject regarding pit bulls, you’ll say that all that matters is the likelihood of death occurring.… Read more »
cheshire572
cheshire572
You’re entitled to your opinion but not your own facts. For example CDC has this to say. The very scientists who have authored studies trying to determine a link between breed and aggressiveness oppose breed discrimination and BSL. In many of the CDC studies, the scientists cautioned against using their incomplete data on attacks to make knee-jerk legislative or policy decisions based solely on breed. They pointed to the lack of reliable data on bites per breed (the “numerator problem”) and the absence of a reliable count of dogs per breed (the “denominator problem”). AMVA Dog bite statistics are not… Read more »
cheshire572
cheshire572

There were 16,550 bite claims last year, 33,169 gun related deaths and 33,000 deaths from poison, but which one do we regulate?

Amy Robinson
Admin
Amy Robinson

So it’s important to pet a dog only when the dog shows he wants it, normally by resting his head on your hand, brushing it with the side of his head, or turning sideways to show you his body; a gesture of trust and acceptance. Also, pit bull stats are whack because there are so many more of them, estimates vary from 3 to 6 million in the US compared with about 800,000 German shepherds. Good article Sara.

Amy Robinson
Admin
Amy Robinson

So it’s important to pet a dog only when the dog shows he wants it, normally by resting his head on your hand, brushing it with the side of his head, or turning sideways to show you his body; a gesture of trust and acceptance. Also, pit bull stats are whack because there are so many more of them, estimates vary from 3 to 6 million in the US compared with about 800,000 German shepherds. Good article Sara.

Gary Johnson
Gary Johnson

It looks as if your ‘stats’ are a little whack there Amy!

Shayesmom
Shayesmom

There are about 3.5 million registered German Shepherds in the U.S. That doesn’t include the unregistered or mixed Shepherds. http://mygermanshepherd.org/global-gsd-population-how-many-gsds-are-there-in-the-world/

cheshire572
cheshire572

Second favorite according to AKC I would think more like 4.5 and a fine dog. Just for perspective 3 x more likely to be injured on a bicycle than bit by a dog.

Gary Johnson
Gary Johnson

Wow! Dog bite injuries equal almost 1/3 of total bicycle injuries. I didn’t realize the numbers were that high. Glad you put it in perspective!

Servaline
Servaline
And, then there are the 2015 dog bite fatality statistics. Together, pit bulls (28) and rottweilers (3), the second most lethal dog breed, accounted for 91% of the total recorded deaths in 2015. This same combination also accounted for 76% of all fatal attacks during the 11-year period of 2005 to 2015. And, since a high court has ruled that any intelligent human can identify a pit bull breed, don’t say the media has gotten the offending breeds wrong. My son is a police officer and they, I assure you, can identify a pit bull breed and there are police… Read more »
cheshire572
cheshire572

Not what I said. Do you have a valid point?

anonymous
anonymous
Jared
Jared

Agreed. I’m working out of town and having to live in a hotel because none of the RV parks will allow me to stay in their park, in my RV because I own an “aggressive” breed. This is costing me $1000 more a month out of my pocket. Good, hard working citizens with well behaved, well trained dogs should not be treated like second rate citizens.

kimboley
kimboley
And does anybody wonder why dog bite claims are like the third highest liability claim to a home owner? Opportunity. Look at how many times a person interacts with a dog each day. Each interaction is an opportunity for something to happen and the dog to bite. A child may interact with the dog 25 to 50 times a day. They may only ride their bike once or twice a day. The housekeeper may only come over 2 times a week, limiting her opportunity to slip and break her leg. Considering the overwhelming numbers of opportunities that there are for… Read more »
cheshire572
cheshire572

Consider that in the same time period there were 19,900,000 unintended accidents in the home that required medical attention. compared to 16,500 dog bite claims.

Source Insurance Industry Institute

Ophiuchus Oversoul
Ophiuchus Oversoul

I don’t think its unfair. If a pit bull or rottie bites it can and often does result in serious expensive physical damage. If a german shepard or collie bites it’s usually just a bite that needs a few stitches and the dog backs off. The insurance company will have to pay a lot more money out if the victim ends up in ICU vs just a visit to the ER for some stitches.

Kim B
Kim B

So not true

Ophiuchus Oversoul
Ophiuchus Oversoul

Well my children’s hospital nurse, niece, and plastic surgeon’s father in law would really disagree with you because of their real life experiences with dog bites.

cheshire572
cheshire572

Most of the cost of claim is lawsuits.

Megan
Megan

As someone who trains Belgian Malinios for personal protection work, I beg to differ. German shepherds, Malinois and Collies can and do inflict serious damage. I know of at least one person requiring 10+ stitches from a well placed Chihuahua bite. The breed doesn’t dictate the severity of the bite, the attitude and intention of the dog does. It depends if it is a “warning nip” or if the dog means serious business.

Michael Fargo
Michael Fargo

You’re talking about a trained animal. I think the issue is when a dog bite is unpredictable/unanticipated and usually triggered by protective behavior, a perceived threat, or some other behavior that triggers an attack. As well, the reaction of the person or animal that’s being bitten can unknowingly escalate the attack.

Ophiuchus Oversoul
Ophiuchus Oversoul
Right well pit bulls have a tendency to not give warning bites, they are either all in or all out. I have a relative who works at a children’s hospital in the ER and from her mouth I have been told “every serious life threatening bite case we get is by a pit bull”. She has no reason to lie, so I have no reason to not believe her. My own job puts me at risk of dog bite and the only time I have been genuinely concerned about a biting dog (nip vs a genuine attack) was with pit… Read more »
Kim B
Kim B

There is a reason she doesn’t know that it’s a “pit bull” because the facts are that even professionals can’t identify a dog as a pit bull breed type simply by looking at it. So, she’s not lying; she just doesn’t know the facts. And, unfortunately, she is spreading untruths out of ignorance.

kimboley
kimboley

Children go to the emergency room for injuries from bicycles and poisoning more often than they do from dog bites. I don’t see the insurance companies restricting bikes or poisons kept in the home. How about a mandatory education class in you want to be insured and own a dog. Any dog can bite. Yes, the bigger ones can do more damage, so the owners need to be more responsible and more educated. Education is the only way to prevent most of the dog bites that happen on the owner’s property and could have been prevented with some education.

Baruch BenAvrohom
Baruch BenAvrohom

It’s perfectly fair. It’s based on accurate statistical analyses of recorded attacks and fatalities instead of emotion-based but factually-unsubstantiated opinions and anecdotal examples.

Kim B
Kim B

Spit out your stats….oh, yeah, you have no “accurate statistical analyses”, I have several to dispute your comment.

Kim B
Kim B

There are minimal accurate stats of recorded dog bites and/or attacks per PROFESSIONAL organizations. There ARE, however, many, many organizations who have performed accurate and fair studies that PROVE that “dogs of targeted breeds (such as Bull Terriers, American Stafordshire Terriers, Staffordshie Bull Terriers, Rottweilers & Dobermans) are statistically NO MORE LIKELY to show inappropriate aggressive behavior.” REF: 1) Journal of Veterinary Behavior (2008) 3: 97:103; “Is there a Difference…..Regarding Aggressive Behaviour?” (2008) 3:134-140; Dr. Esther Schalke

cheshire572
cheshire572

Show me the accurate statistical analysis you quote.

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