Dr. Katherine Baldwin, Veterinarian

Dr. Katherine Baldwin BVetMed (hons) CertAVP (SAM) MRCVS qualified from the Royal Veterinary College, London in 2010. She started her professional life in mixed practice working across small animal, farm, and equine sectors. From here, her passion for medicine grew, and she completed a rotating internship in a specialist referral hospital. She spent the next seven years working in a busy, 24-hour small animal hospital in Cambridgeshire, providing routine and emergency care. Her professional interests are in medical workups, oncology, and ultrasonography. She is passionate about client education and empowering pet owners with knowledge to improve patient welfare and access to veterinary services.

Vet's glove opening dog's infected eye (Caption: Uveitis In Dogs)

Uveitis In Dogs: Cause, Symptoms, Treatment & More

Uveitis is an inflammatory condition of the eye that can happen suddenly in dogs for a variety of reasons. Severe cases of uveitis can affect your dog’s vision and even lead to loss of sight. This article will explore what uveitis is, what might cause it, when to seek veterinary attention, and what treatment options are available.

Greyhound dog passed out on back in dog bed (Caption: Syncope In Dogs)

Syncope In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, Treatment & More

Syncope is a medical term for fainting or passing out. These fainting spells are usually brief, caused by a temporary loss of oxygen and nutrients to the brain. Most dogs recover spontaneously; however, syncope can be a sign of serious heart problems or other conditions in dogs. We’ll explore what causes syncope in dogs, treatment options, and when to seek help if you think your dog has had a syncopal episode.

Longhaired dachshund puppy lying down on the carpet dizzy (Caption: Vestibular Disease In Dogs)

Vestibular Disease In Dogs: Causes, Symptoms, Treatment & More

Vestibular disease (or vestibular syndrome) refers to a group of diseases that affect a dog’s balance system (known as the vestibular system or vestibular apparatus). Common signs of vestibular disease in dogs include loss of balance, falling over, an abnormal flickering of the eyes, and general wobbliness. These signs can occur very suddenly and nearly always warrant veterinary attention. What causes vestibular disease? How is it diagnosed and treated? And what can you do at home to help your canine friend recover?

Dog skin close up with flakes (Caption: Seborrhea In Dogs)

Seborrhea In Dogs: Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment & More

Is your dog greasy, itchy, or smelly at the moment? If so, he might have a condition called seborrhea. It’s always important to get your veterinarian to examine your dog as there are many things to consider when treating this condition. Let’s explore these in more detail and what causes canine seborrhea in the first place.

Brown dog laying on the ground looking at skin issue on back (Caption: Alopecia In Dogs)

Alopecia In Dogs: Is Your Dog Losing More Hair Than Usual?

We all know that dogs shed their fur — we find it often enough on our clothes and furniture! But what if your dog’s coat is starting to look a bit patchy, or there are small bald spots on your dog? Hair loss in dogs is known as alopecia. Let’s explore some of the causes, the diagnostic tests and some treatment options your veterinarian might suggest.

Dog vomiting (Caption: Dog Vomit Color Guide)

Dog Vomit Color Guide: What Does Your Dog’s Vomit Says About Their Health?

Our canine friends vomit from time to time – it’s practically a given when you’re a pet parent that at some point, you will be cleaning up after them. There are endless reasons why our dogs may get sick, and it’s not surprising when we see what habits they have at times. But is it possible to tell why they’re vomiting from the color of their vomit? A dog vomit color guide may be helpful for you to know when you need to worry about your furry best friend.

Dog looking at camera with salt and pepper shakers to left of him (Caption: Can dogs eat black pepper?)

Can Dogs Eat Black Pepper? Is Pepper Bad For Dogs?

We pet parents often consider our furry friends as part of our family, and that may mean them joining in at mealtimes. A lot of people also give their pups “human food” snacks. We know that some foods that are healthy for people are not safe for dogs, but can dogs eat black pepper? Salt and pepper are common seasonings used in a lot of human food. So, before sneaking your furry friend a sly treat, it’s a good idea to find out if dogs can have black pepper.

Dog itching (Caption: Dog Itching Relief)

Dog Itching Relief & Home Remedies For Dog Allergies

Dogs love a good scratch, but excessive itching can be a sign of an underlying allergy or skin condition. It’s possible to spot the signs of irritation caused by skin conditions and manage some of them at home so your dog can get back to his fun-loving antics faster. We’ll help you know how to help give your pup some itch relief and when it’s time to see your veterinarian.

Two Collies sitting in grass with DNA on top of them (Caption: MDR1 In Dogs)

MDR1 In Dogs: Symptoms, Genetic Testing & More

The study of dog genetics is revealing more about the health of our canine companions than ever before. Hidden in the genetic code of some dog breeds is a mutation that can increase their susceptibility to drug toxicity, which can lead to serious health consequences. Awareness of this defect is increasing, but some information and advice about it can be confusing or misinformed. Here, we explain the MDR1 (multi-drug resistance 1) gene, the breeds most affected, how to test for it, and what this genetic mutation could mean for your furry friend.

White dog looking at cut up hot dog on plate (Caption: Can Dogs Eat Hot Dogs?)

Can Dogs Eat Hot Dogs As A Meal Or A Treat?

A hot dog cooked on the grill may seem simply irresistible to your furry friend; what’s not to love? But is it okay for our canine companions to have a hot dog? The answer is mainly yes, but only as a treat. They are okay as an occasional indulgence but are unlikely to form part of a healthy, balanced diet for your dog.

Vet looking at an x-ray of dog (Caption: Intervertebral Disc Disease In Dogs)

Intervertebral Disc Disease (IVDD) In Dogs: Symptoms, Treatment & Prevention

Intervertebral disc disease (IVDD) in dogs is a condition in which the cushioning discs between the  spinal column bones (vertebrae) move or bulge into the spinal canal. The discs then push on the spinal cord or the nerves around it and cause pain, nerve damage, and can even lead to paralysis. Intervertebral disc disease, also referred to as a slipped or herniated disc, is caused by degenerative disc disease. Here is what you need to know about IVDD and how you can help your dog.

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