How To Treat A Poisoned Dog

How do we keep this site running? This post may contain affiliate links — the cost is the same to you, but we get a referral fee. Compensation does not affect rankings. Thanks!

A sick dogDid your pet eat chocolate or get into the antifreeze in the basement? Act quick! It’s toxic and you need to breakout the poison patrol actions ASAP. But what do you do? Here are the five steps you need to take to get Spot back into good health in no time.

Five Steps to Treat a Poisoned Dog

1. Do Not Panic

It is easy to panic when a loved one is in trouble, but this is the time when you need to take charge of the situation and act with purpose and speed.

2. Dog Poison Symptoms

Is your dog acting lethargic, or more hyper than normal? Are there signs that he got into something he shouldn’t have that might be toxic? Then you need to start by figuring out exactly what your pet’s poison is and how much was consumed. If it’s food related, you may have a little more time to act and treat than you would with chemical poisons. But, do not assume this. Take notes (literally) of what the poison is and your pet’s symptoms so you do not forget once you are in panic mode and talking to someone who can help. You may even want to take a quick video with your smartphone of strange behavior.

3.  Call the Vet

If you have a pet, you should always have your vet’s phone number programmed into your cell phone and in a place in the home where you can always find it (refrigerator door perhaps). This way it is easy to find when you need it most. It’s also a good idea to have the contact details for the 24/7 emergency vet that is closest to your home in case something goes wrong on the weekend or late at night.

So, since you know right where the number is, do not delay. Call your vet right away to explain the situation and ask advice for next steps. If they are closed, call the emergency vet. Be sure to have your notes in hand and be prepared to jump in the car to head for help immediately.

4. Pet Poison Hotline

If you cannot reach a local vet, you can call the Pet Poison Helpline. They can be reached at 855-213-6680.

5. Do Not Search for Answers on the Internet

If you are reading this, it is probably too late to warn you against this but remember, that you need to act quickly. A local vet or poison expert is better suited to do this than your computer. And, they can help you treat your specific situation while keeping you focused on your dog versus all the random horror stories you will find online. So, step away from the computer right now and CALL THE VET. Do not administer home treatment unless directed by a professional as you may cause more pain than assistance.

What has your dog gotten into that created a poison scare?

Since the day she was born, Michelle has lived in a home full of dogs and dog lovers. Her home is no exception with two adorable rescue pups of her own, Bella and Lily. Their unconditional love and never ending tail wags make every day brighter.

Leave a Reply

2 Comments on "How To Treat A Poisoned Dog"

avatar
BRAD
BRAD
MY 14 year old Lab left the house went to unknown place and came back 40 mins later and instantly fell over and started the first convulsions and yellowish/frothy foam coming out mouth. This went on for 5 mins or so then he slowly came to. Then seemed disoriented in house attempting to walk up the wall and such. Then later in the day he had violent seizure/convulsions and seemed exacerbated by noise and sunlight outside. I took him in house and that lasted 30+ mins. I literally gave him some Hash infused coconut butter and THANkFULLY HE calmed down and his breathing slowed. I took him to vet but he was “out of it” from butter. The vet just checked to see if he was responsive when she touched him and he jerked his leg and she told me to “keep the seizures down with the butter” NEXT morning I didnt have chance to give him more butter before I awoke and he then started sets of what seemed like convulsions, paddling, kicking his feet, seems like he was suffocating, head back and lying on his side the whole time. THIS WAS THE START OF MY 24 HRS OF HELL. I could not get any HI butter down his throat as he would not open mouth/ as seemed “locked” so the tremors and heavy breathing continued. I took temperatures when heavy breathing and it was 105’s + I poured cold water on him got all the ice out of fridge and tried to cool him down. It did come down but STILL not able to quell the tremors/convulsions etc. I accidentally stepped on his arm while stepping over him with AC unit and he pulled it back as if he felt it [during a “seizure too]. His eyes were watery etc. but seemed he could see and all but his body was out of control and it went in cycles. I was torn between checking on him and leaving him alone because every time he heard my seemed the convulsions got worse. MY NIGHT OF HELL ended just before noon next day and he died with his head back. He never had a seizure before this episode in his 14 years+. I PAINFULLY TOOK VIDEO OF HIS ACTIONS AND OFFERED IT TO THE VET BUT SEEMS THEY JUST CALLED IT “BRAIN ISSUES GOING ON FROM HIS AGE” DESPITE MY VET ASKING ME IF HE HAD ACCESS TO STRYCHNINE ON THREE DIFFERENT OCCASIONS. [THAT actually seems odd]. If strychnine poisoning, would the tremors be continuous or come and go? PLEASE GIVE ME SOME INSIGHT OR A COGENT WEBPAGE EXPLAINING THESE UNANSWERED QUESTIONS as I promised my dog while SUFFERING BEYOND ANYTHING I COULD IMAGINE that I would GET ANSWERS FOR HIM AND HIS DEATH WOULD NOT BE IN VAIN. please help me find closure for my VERY TOUGH BOY.

thanks

elna
elna
Hi Brad, dog poisoning in south africa is a daily phenomonim. My beloved Uno was poisoned with two step poison, you can find it on google. We keep activated charcoal in our homes as a remedy. Charcoal doesnt absorb, it binds with more than 28 of the most deadliest poisons on the market. You can google that too. They even use it in hospitals as a treatment for poisoning. Safe for humans and anials. Unfortunately it didn’t help in my beloved Uno’s case. I sincerely hope you find assistane in my advice ? Kindest regards, from a fellow dog lover, Elna
wpDiscuz

Send this to a friend