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What Foods Are Toxic for Dogs

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Dog Eating in Fridge

There are certain foods that you should not feed your dog under any occasion. While individual cases will vary based on breed, weight, and other factors – in general this list of foods applies to all dogs and should be carefully followed to avoid accidents. Take note and print out our helpful infographic to keep on-hand in your kitchen.

Just Because Humans Like it, Doesn’t Mean Dogs Will

Cute Puppy: Save Money at the Vet with InsuranceFoods that are perfectly suitable for human consumption, as well as other animals, may be toxic and even poisonous to your dog, posing a serious threat to its health and well-being. Why? Because all animals have very different rates of metabolism. Metabolism is basically the process of breaking down food and turning it into energy.

Please note that while we’re attempting to add every food we can find that is potentially unsafe for dogs, there are certain foods that we may miss, so don’t consider a food safe to feed to our dog just because it’s not on this list. Do your research if you are uncertain and let us know by adding a comment below with your new information so that we can keep this list updated. If you are worried about something your pet consumed, please call your vet promptly.

List of Foods Not to Feed Your Dog

Here’s an alphabetized list of foods that are unsafe and unfit for canine consumption, many of which are toxic for dogs. We’ll be updating it and adding foods as we learn more. The ones in red italics are especially dangerous and often poisonous for canines.

And be sure to look below this list for a helpful and sharable Infographic to print out and keep on your fridge.

Alcohol – I’m sure you’ve heard of the birthday parties where the dog accidentally gets into some of the spilled keg beer, and then gets all silly to the amusement of the crowd. While it may be funny to you, it’s not funny to your dog. Alcohol can cause not only intoxication, lack of coordination, poor breathing, and abnormal acidity, but potentially even coma and/or death.

Apple Seeds – The casing of apple seeds are toxic to a dog as they contain a natural chemical (amygdlin) that releases cyanide when digested. This is really only an issue if a large amount was eaten and the seed were chewed up by the dog, causing it to enter its blood stream. But to play it safe, be sure to core and seed apples before you feed them to your dog.

Avocado – Avocados contain Persin, which can cause diarrhea, vomiting, and heart congestion.

Baby Food – Baby food by itself isn’t terrible, just make sure it doesn’t contain any onion powder. Baby food also doesn’t contain all the nutrients a dog relies on for a healthy, well maintained diet.

Cooked Bones – When it comes to bones, the danger is that cooked bones can easily splinter when chewed by your dog. Raw (uncooked) bones, however, are appropriate and good for both your dog’s nutritional and teeth.

Candy and Chewing Gum – Not only does candy contain sugar, but it often contains Xylitol, which can lead to the over-release of insulin, kidney failure, and worse.

Cat Food – Not that they would want this anyway, but cat food contains proteins and fats that are targeted at the diet of a cat, not a dog. The protein and fat levels in cat food are too high for your dog, and not healthy.

Chocolate – You’ve probably heard this before, but chocolate is a definite no no for your pup. And it’s not just about caffeine, which is enough to harm your dog by itself, but theobromine and theophylline, which can be toxic, cause panting, vomiting, and diarrhea, and damage your dog’s heart and nervous systems.

Citrus Oil Extracts – Can cause vomiting.

Coffee – Not sure why you would give your dog coffee, but pretty much the same applies here as to chocolate. This is essentially poison for your dog if ingested.

Corn on the Cob– This is a sure way to get your dog’s intestine blocked. The corn is digested, but the cob gets lodged in the small intestine, and if it’s not removed surgically, can prove fatal to your dog. Additionally, too much corn kernels can upset the digestive tract as well so be cautious to not feed too much.

Fat Trimmings – Can cause pancreatitis.

Fish – The primary fish that you need to be careful about are salmon and trout. Raw salmon can be fatal to dogs if the fish is infected with a certain parasite, Nanophyetus salmincola. The parasite itself isn’t dangerous to dogs, but is often infected with a bacteria called Neorickettsia helminthoeca, which in many cases is fatal to dogs if not treated properly. If diagnosis occurs early on, the dog has a great chance of recovering. Cooked salmon is fine as it kills the parasite.

Garlic – While garlic can be okay for dogs in very small amounts (and even beneficial for flea treatment), larger amounts can be risky. Garlic is related to onions which is toxic for dogs so it may be best to just avoid it.

Grapes and Raisins – This is one that lots of dog owners are unaware of. Grapes contain a toxin that can cause severe liver damage and kidney failure. We’ve heard stories of dogs dying from only a handful of grapes so do not feed your pup this toxic food.

Hops – An ingredient in beer that can be toxic to your dog. The consumption of hops by your dog can cause panting, an increased heart rate, fever, seizures, and even death.

Human Vitamins – Some human vitamins are okay to use, but the key is comparing the ingredients (all of them – active and inactive) to the vitamins your vet subscribes for your dog (often you can get the human equivalent for much less money). Make sure there’s no iron – iron can damage the digestive system lining, and prove poisonous for the liver and kidneys.

Liver – In small amounts, liver is great but avoid feeding too much liver to your dog. Liver contains quite a bit of Vitamin A, which can adversely affect your pup’s muscles and bones.

Macadamia Nuts – These contain a toxin that can inhibit locomotory activities, resulting in weakness, panting, swollen limbs, and tremors as well as possible damage to your dog’s digestive, nervous, and muscle systems.

Chihuahua with big boneMarijuana – Not that you would pass the bong to your dog, but if you do, you should know that marijuana can adversely affect your pup’s nervous system and heart rate, and induce vomiting. Read more about Dogs and Marijuana.

Milk and Dairy Products – While small doses aren’t going to kill your dog, you could get some smelly farts and some nasty cases of diarrhea. Why? Dogs are lactose intolerant (as are an increasing number of humans today), and don’t have enough of the lactase enzyme to properly digest dairy foods. If you really need to give them dairy, look into lactose-free dairy products.

Mushrooms – Just as the wrong mushroom can be fatal to humans, the same applies to dogs. Don’t mess with them.

Onions and Chives – No matter what form they’re in (dry, raw, cooked, powder, within other foods), onions are some of the absolute worst foods you could possibly give your pup (it’s poisonous for dogs, and its even worse for cats). They contain disulfides and sulfoxides (thiosulphate), both of which can cause anemia and damage red blood cells.

Persimmons, Peaches and Plums – Peach pits are not only a choke hazard they contain amygdalin, a cyanide and sugar compound that degrades into hydrogen cyanide (HCN) when metabolized. Pear seeds also contain trace amount of arsenic and are dangerous. So if you live in an area that is home to persimmon, peach, or plum trees, look out. Persimmon seeds and peach and plum pits can cause intestinal obstruction and enteritis. You’ll want to make sure there aren’t any wild persimmon or other fruit trees that produce seeds growing in your backyard. If you notice your dog pooping all over the place, and see a bunch of seeds or pits in their waste, you’ll need to break out the saw and chop down some trees.

Rhubarb and Tomato Leaves – These contain oxalates, which can adversely affect the digestive, nervous, and urinary systems.

Raw Fish – Another vitamin B (Thiamine) deficiency can result from the regular consumption of raw fish. Loss of appetite will be common, followed by seizures, and in rare instances, death.

Salt – Just like salt isn’t the healthiest thing for humans, it’s even less healthy for dogs. Too much of it can lead to an imbalance in electrolyte levels, dehydration and potentially diarrhea.

Spices containing Capsaicin – Capsaicin, found in chili powder, paprika, and just about any other pepper (bell, chili, etc.), is an irritant for mammals of all shape and size.

String – While not a food itself, foods can often contain or be similar to string (ie. meat you’ve wrapped for the oven). If your dog were to eat a string, it could get stuck in their digestive tract and cause complications.

Sugar – This applies to any food containing sugar. Make sure you check the ingredient label for human foods – corn syrup (which is a less expensive form of sugar or glucose) is found in just about everything these days. Too much sugar for your pup can lead to dental issues, obesity, and even diabetes.

Tobacco – A major toxic hazard for dogs (and humans). The effects nicotine has on dogs are far worse than on humans. Nicotine can damage your pup’s digestive and nervous systems, increase their heart rate, make them pass out, and ultimately result in death.

Xylitol – A sugar alcohol found in gum, candies, baked goods, and other sugar-substituted items, Xylitol, while causing no apparent harm to humans, is extremely toxic to dogs. Even small amounts can cause low blood sugar, seizures, liver failure, even death for your pup.

Yeast (on its own or in dough) – Just like yeast rises in bread, it will also expand and rise within your pup’s tummy. Make sure they don’t get any. While mild cases will cause gas, lots of farting, and discomfort – too much of it could rupture their stomach and intestines.

Infographic: Foods that Are Toxic for Dogs

Infographic: List of Foods Not To Feed Your Dog

Keep These Out of Your Dog’s Reach as Well

While these don’t fall in a particular category above, you’ll want to avoid them as well:

Old Food – You don’t like old and moldy food, so what makes you think your dog will? The bacteria in spoiled food contains all sorts of toxins that can be damaging to your dog’s health. Feed them the freshest and best, dog-approved food only!

Dog with dog foodLeftovers – I know it’s difficult to keep your dog from feasting on your dinner left overs after they’ve had to sit there and watch you eat it all in front of them. But the fact is that if you feed them leftovers regularly they won’t be getting a proper diet. If you do give them table scraps, make sure to take out any bones and trim down the fat.

Check the Ingredients – Bottom line is be sure to know what’s in the food you’re giving your dog. The items from the list above should definitely not be on there. You’d be surprised at how many foods contain sugar and caffeine, that you wouldn’t expect to without first checking the ingredient list.

Human SnacksChips can contain garlic and onion powder, cookies may contain raisins, chocolate or macadamia nuts, etc. Bottom line – there’s a reason there’s food and treats made especially for dogs.

When in Doubt, Ask a Vet

If your dog is acting strangely, or experiencing even minor symptoms including weakness, lack of coordination, vomiting, diarrhea, etc. and you think he or she may have consumed something they shouldn’t have, seek a veterinarian’s attention immediately. If you wait too long, your dog might not make it.

Hold up! Before your pup eats that hotdog, take the proactive step of getting pet insurance. That way if an accidental treat becomes a medical emergency, your dog (and your wallet) will be better protected. Check out this video to get more detail about the types of pet insurance and what to consider when purchasing.

You can also visit the ASPCA website for the most up-to-date details on safe foods for your dog.

Keep Your Dog on a Healthy Diet

Choosing to raise a dog is a big responsibility. Just as with a child, you’ve welcomed another living being into your household and family. We probably don’t have to tell you to take care of your dog, but what people often don’t realize is that as similar as the two can be, they also have very different needs when it comes to food. Ask your veterinarian what kind of food might be best for your particular dog breed as well as age and any special needs.

What If You Cannot Reach Your Veterinarian?

In an emergency when your veterinarian cannot be reached you should contact your local animal emergency clinic or call the animal poison hotline at 888-232-8870. You can also try the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at 888-426-4435. Depending on the nature of the item ingested the animal poison hotline or your veterinarian may induce vomiting to regurgitate the item that has been ingested. If the item is something that is likely to cause further damage to your dog on the way back up, vomiting will not be induced and other methods of helping your dog will be discussed such as having your dog ingest an item which will bind to the offending food and neutralize it or surgery to remove the item that is causing your dog’s problems.

Safe Human Foods for Dogs

There are human foods that are permissible to feed to your dog; however, even these foods should be kept to a minimum. Things that you can feed to your dog without worrying about side effects include:

Lean Meat – Lean meat includes meat without bones that has had excessive fat removed. If feeding chicken and turkey, the skin should also be removed as it can be a source of fat. Lean meat includes the white meat from chicken or turkey and provides a tasty treat for your dog as well as a good source of protein. Both raw and cooked, lean meat is great source of nutrients and protein for your pup.

Eggs – The most obvious problem here is salmonella, but Raw diet enthusiasts tout the power of a raw egg in your dog’s diet. While the white contains the Avidin enzyme, which inhibits the absorption of vitamin B (Biotin), the yolk contains more than enough Biotin to even out the enzyme. So, when fed raw and whole, or cooked and whole, eggs are an excellent source of protein and a host of vitamins for your pup.

Fruits – Not including the fruits listed above, dogs can safely enjoy bananas, apple slices, strawberries, blueberries and watermelon. The seeds should be removed from these fruits or in the case of watermelon it should be a seedless melon as most fruit seeds contain a trace amount of arsenic which is poisonous (it’s a small amount but why risk it?). Fresh fruits are a great treat to assist in training your dog and can also provide your dog with a great way to cool down on a hot summer day!

Vegetables – Certain vegetables like carrots, green beans, cucumber slices or zucchini slices all make great treats for your dog. It’s a good idea to replace commercial dog treats with baby carrots if you are looking to slim your dog down a little bit. Vegetables make great low-calorie snacks and good training tools as well. But stay away from canned and pickled vegetables as they contain too much salt.

Baked Potatoes – A plain baked potato is okay to feed your dog but honestly it is not something that should be done frequently and should never include any toppings. A few slices of cooked baked potato can make a great treat for a patient dog at a meal time though.

White Rice and Pasta – White rice and pasta are frequently referred to as a potential meal for a dog with an upset stomach. Generally boiled white chicken and white rice are used to help firm up stools as well as nourish a dog that is having trouble getting any nutrition from food as a result of illness.

While there are certainly some human foods that are safe to feed your dog there are many which are unsafe and potentially poisonous when ingested by your dog. As a general rule of thumb, it is far better to be safe than sorry so avoid feeding your dog any human food unless recommended by your vet. Dogs that are not given human food or table scraps are generally better behaved than dogs who do receive people food anyway, they do not beg because they know they won’t receive any scraps and they also tend to drool less and bother visitors to your home less because they understand that human food is for humans and not for them.

Disclaimer: Information published on this website is intended for reference use only. The only clear option for ensuring your pet’s health is to feed commercial grade dog foods and treats only. Feeding human foods of any sort carries some degree of risk and is not under the control of this website.


About Michelle Schenker
Since the day she was born, Michelle has lived in a home full of dogs and dog lovers. Her home is no exception with two adorable rescue pups of her own, Bella and Lily. Their unconditional love and never ending tail wags make every day brighter.
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393 Comments on "What Foods Are Toxic for Dogs"

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sheryl
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sheryl

My dog ate some uncooked sice . Will he be ok?

Kimberly Alt
Editor

I suggest contacting your vet and asking. Be sure to note the type of rice your dog ate and how much. Let us know what you find out and good luck!

Sherry
Guest
Sherry

Corn on the cob? My dog goes to the corn field and picks an ear of corn and eats it!

Jay
Guest

My little brown dog just passed away and the last thing i feed him was classic lay,s.Im prety sure he died from old age and not the chips.

Kimberly Alt
Editor

I’m so sorry for your loss Jay. Our thoughts are with you.

Hunter987
Guest
Hunter987

Pork is bad for your dog DO NOT LET YOUR DOG CONSUME

Ajay soni
Guest
Ajay soni

Rice is safe for dogs or not..??I have a pet 2years old ..His digestive system always have problem..So most of d tyms he remains unwell..Plz tell me wat a balanced diet for a 2years dog should be

Kimberly Alt
Editor

Rice is okay for dogs, but check with your vet first. I suggest asking your vet what your dog should be eating. It can vary based on breed, age, weight, dietary needs/restrictions, etc.

RobertFromUSA
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RobertFromUSA

About 70% of this list is fearmongering bull****.

Doug Hanna
Guest
Doug Hanna

Pumpkin pie and apple pie, he doesn’t get people food ever. But he got into the pie and ate a piece of both. Only weighs 8 lbs. Concerned about the cinnamon and carnation milk ingredients. Any ideas?

Kimberly Alt
Guest
Kimberly Alt

I’m unsure about cinnamon but dairy can cause some issues with your dog’s bowel movements. If he is feeling unwell, you should take him to the vet.

Brenda koahou
Guest
Brenda koahou

I have two puppies mixed breed last night the little male started to throw up. I think it was possible he got a cigg butt. He is not throwing up now but is very tired doesn’t want to eat or drink. Just wants to sleep what can I do I can’t afford a vet right now. I’m just sick. He doesn’t have the parvo smell.

Amypz
Guest
Amypz

I make my dog’s food; I use ground chicken, pork, or turkey; add green beans, zucchini, and carrots; I also add oatmeal. Then I mix this with her regular dry dog food to ensure she gets her nutrients.

Amanda Ross
Guest
Amanda Ross

It seems whenever I feed my 3 dogs and 5 cats pork it gives them all loose poop. Does anybody else have the same problem?

Marcus Taber
Guest
Marcus Taber

Capsaicin is not found in black pepper. Black pepper and peppers are not related at all. One is a spice from Indonesia, the other is a plant from South America.

Kimberly Alt
Guest
Kimberly Alt

Thank you Marcus, you are correct! We will be sure to update our article.

Robert Jewell
Guest
Robert Jewell

There isn’t any capsaicin in black pepper. That’s an unrelated plant containing piperine. Black pepper isn’t really a pepper that’s just its common name.

tansysmom
Guest
tansysmom

Off-topic, why do most comment boards–on ANY subject–always degenerate into a bunch of bickering 5-year-olds? Is that a new form of entertainment for the socially immature, or what?

tansysmom
Guest
tansysmom
Two problems with this article: Salt in small amounts is fine for both people and pets, and in fact even necessary. Also, we do feed our dog “people food” (but not a hodge-podge of scraps). It’s far more nutritious than any dog food that comes in a bag or a can. She gets a high protein, mostly grain-free diet of meat, poultry, and eggs, along with a bit of diced up veggies, sometimes a little rice, and occasionally a small piece or two of fruit. A sprinkle of powdered dog vitamins is usually added to cover all the bases. She’s… Read more »
Bork
Guest
Bork

Yeah the article is saying “people food” is the hodgepodge of scraps, all the foods you listed as feeding your dog with are said to be safe in this article and basic foods, not human specific foods like chips, seasoned pork roast, buttered toast crust, etc. Well fed dogs still will beg for “human food” when they think they’re going to get those treats.

Ettina
Guest
Ettina
Not all dogs are lactose intolerant. Despite having a sensitive stomach in other ways, my dog has always handled dairy products just fine. Although nearly all wolves are lactose intolerant, dogs have lived alongside milking cows as long as humans have, and were under similar selective pressure to retain lactose tolerance beyond infancy. Although lactose intolerance is more common in dogs (and cats) than in humans, many dogs and cats are fine with dairy. And since the consequences of lactose intolerance are uncomfortable but not fatal, it’s worth trying a small amount and keeping an eye on them if you’d… Read more »
Gary Rokuta
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Gary Rokuta

Grounded black pepper on Heartland web….included that, if true then bummer because the alkaloid pipeline would help with sustained and retention with example: tumeric, circumin with absorption but if passes right through, loss of effectiveness. Am I making sense, to be understood?….thankyou Gary

Kimberly Alt
Guest
Kimberly Alt

Sorry Gary, I’m not quite sure what you’re saying.

Jesus
Guest
Jesus

I gave my dog spicy popcorn

Debbie Nelson
Guest
Debbie Nelson
I just read this and noticed grapes were on the list. I have a B&G macaw parrot that loves grapes and so did my fox terrier, Abby. I was not aware they could be toxic. Years go by and at a vet check I mentioned that Abby eats everything Sophie, my parrot does. He said wow, such as? I said nuts, bananas, pasta, broccoli, and grapes. When I said grapes he asked how many. I said 2-3 per day for the past 5-6 years. He was shocked and said he was going to write an article to someplace about this… Read more »
Karen
Guest
Karen

My dog is real picky, so when I found a treat he liked, and got a few bags, someone told me that it wasn’t good for my dog. Can anyone tell me if Alpo snacks are bad for a Shih Tzu?

Liew Hong Khang
Guest
Liew Hong Khang

Just wanna ask, will people food like left over and old food lead to gastroenteritis in dog? Thank you very much.

Kitty
Guest
Kitty

“Cat food – Not that they would want this anyway” If my dog, Maggie, sees the cat food I have to drag her away from it. She is obsessed with it. I have to feed the cat behind closed doors or Maggie won’t eat dog food, even if the cat food is where she can’t reach, if she knows it’s there she won’t have anything else.

Jerome Lehmann
Guest
Jerome Lehmann

Uhm hum what kind of sick person would give mj to a dog!! Are you psychologically sick or what‼️

Stella
Guest
Stella

Is cereal ok? Cuz I didn’t notice I dropped a cheerio on the floor and he ate something and it sounded like a cheerio I made him drink some water in case it’s not listed in this list is it ok? Will he be fine?

Kimberly Alt
Guest
Kimberly Alt

If your dog ate a Cheerio he will be fine. Since it is a bland cereal he probably looked at it like a treat.

Lady Garlicf
Guest
Lady Garlicf

A site written up by a Vet maintains that Garlic is very dangerous for dogs. It bursts the red blood cells. I see on your site it is listed as “a little is safe” even beneficial”.

Kimberly Alt
Guest
Kimberly Alt

Garlic has been a controversial subject. While some people believe it’s 100% toxic others believe it is okay in a very small amount. We understand if you do not want to feed your dog garlic. We have read many articles on the subject and believe that garlic can be beneficial to dogs in very small doses. It is even found in some dog foods. We suggest speaking with your vet about giving your dog garlic if you are considering it.

Colleen
Guest
Colleen

Is it bad to feed a dog roast beef lunch meat

Michelle Schenker
Guest
Michelle Schenker

Most lunch meats contain nitrates which are bad for dogs.

Kris Howell Craig
Guest
Kris Howell Craig

I am afraid my french bulldog ate about ten fruit snack packages ate the wrappers too. Any recommendations???

Kimberly Alt
Guest
Kimberly Alt

Take your dog to the vet ASAP.

Laura
Guest
Laura

Antifreeze/coolant causes acute renal failure.

saien matadin
Guest
saien matadin

Hey, I think my 11 month old beagle ate some prestik, is that bad for her?

Kimberly Alt
Guest
Kimberly Alt

We aren’t familiar with prestik, but if you are at all concerned for your dogs health you should take her to the vet immediately.

Mike
Guest
Mike

I believe all sugars ending in tol are very dangerous (sorbitol, eyrthritol, xylitol and so on).

john
Guest
john

My dog won’t eat dog food. He eats lean beef of all kinds chicken white or brown rice what can I add to it so he gets a proper balance of necessary vitamins and minerals?

Kimberly Alt
Guest
Kimberly Alt

Hi John, here are some homemade dog food recipes for you to try out! https://www.caninejournal.com/homemade-dog-food-recipes/

Gavin
Guest
Gavin

Is it ok to feed your dog syrup? I know it has sugar in it but it doesn’t have a lot.

Kimberly Alt
Guest
Kimberly Alt

Hi Gavin, I suggest not feeding your dog syrup. Since it’s not really a “human meal” (more of a topping) it’s something you can avoid giving your dog. Syrup has quite a bit of sugar in it, and too much sugar for a dog can cause dental problems, obesity and diabetes. To keep your pup healthy, I would avoid the syrup.

mark
Guest
mark

My dog is a 2 year old jack Russell. As of the last 4 months, he’s taken to nibbling on blankets and other articles. Anyone know why he does this?

Paula paul
Guest
Paula paul

I. Have a dog that does this. I call it nibbling. He tends to do this as a security measure or when he gets sleep

Stephen Wood
Guest
Stephen Wood

I take issue with the raw salmon. I have a dog that has LIVED on raw fish and raw chicken with a bit of cooked beef. She has eaten salmon fillets and even salmon skeletons. We only started cooking the salmon and chicken when she turned 12 and is now 14. No problems at all until 13 which as far as we are concerned is a LONG life for my husky/shepherd/wolf cross.

Kara
Guest

What about hot dogs? How healthy are they for dogs? I have a friend who puts his dog’s medicine in pieces of hot dogs. So she probably eats at least a 1/4 of a hot dog daily. She has a heart condition and has put on weight and lost muscle mass since this started so now I’m wondering if there’s something better that’s still low in cost that my friend could use.

Michelle Schenker
Guest
Michelle Schenker

Hi Kara, most hot dogs contain nitrates which are bad for most living beings. So, I would recommend that your friend switch to something more natural for the medicine delivery… perhaps a piece of cheese or some peanut butter. My dogs also like cream cheese.

Midnight Rider
Guest
Midnight Rider
I would like to add to the list of foods that will adversely effect a dog: Spicy foods are terrible for them. Yesterday, I fed my Labrottie a couple of left over pre-seasoned rib scraps. This morning, he had vomited up all of his food from yesterday. That is how I came across this site; looking for a solution to his sickness. This site helped by recommending rice as a way to settle his tummy. I mixed in very little chicken hoping to entice him to eat. At first, he wouldn’t touch it; however, about 3 hours later, he finally… Read more »
Eden
Guest
Eden
Poison! GARLIC is all toxic to animals!!! To post a suggestion that garlic is a safe food is wrong! It acts just like onion. They are in the same family. It’s been known many years now, yet many vet’s have not kept up on toxic foods. It will eventually cause blood and organ issues, including failure, disease and death!! Raw bones of any sort, are bad!! They still splinter, chip, cause tooth wear down, breakage and gum issues. As well as increase bacterial load, thus causing oral disease. All pork is toxic and only white meat of chicken and turkey… Read more »
Midnight Rider
Guest
Midnight Rider

You have presented a fabulous and well stated, well informed comment and it is very much appreciated. Thanks for taking the time to prepare it. It was great!

Eden
Guest
Eden

Thank you 🙂 I appreciate your kindness. It gets depressing when heartless creeps prefer arrogance over the health and safety of their pets. I shut off notifications and just signed on to do something and saw your nice note:). Thank you for loving your pets and sending me a nice note. The support is truly appreciated♡:) =^..^= Eden Wild

Midnight Rider
Guest
Midnight Rider

You are so very welcome, Eden. Any time I see someone doing something good and kind for others, I want to thank them.

MG
Guest
Raw bones are bad? You obviously never really had a dog. Pork is not toxic to dogs and ONLY White meat of chicken and turkey? Let us ponder how a dog eats in the wild… ummm, let me kill that bird and make sure to only get his “white flesh”. Oh hold on a minute, I need a carrot – where is that human to break my carrot in half? Oh dear let me run to William Sonoma and get myself a pot (probably teflon if you were cooking) and then it’s off to the supermarket to pick up some… Read more »
Eden
Guest
Eden
Coyote, wolves and foxes do not live as long as domesticated canines. Bones risk internal puncture, choking and impaction. Pet’s often gulp down bones not fully chewed up to a fine crush. Small shards can still cause death. Wild canine eat live caught prey and carrion – not rich fatty dark meat that causes great distress on their system. How sad that I’m sharing up-to-date veterinary science. Not some chat, because my pet enjoys sharing table food and horrible dietary selections but their owner’s. I was informing owners who want to do better. Dogs eat corn but it’s not great… Read more »
Midnight Rider
Guest
Midnight Rider

Amen!

Marky
Guest
Marky

GARLIC?!?!

Brady
Guest
Brady

Can I give human vitamin E oil to my dog oraly or rubbed on dry skin?

Michelle Schenker
Guest
Michelle Schenker

Hi Brady, I would recommend you stick to breaking open the capsule and rubbing it on your dogs dry skin to be safe. Sometimes the capsules can be made out of foreign materials that may not agree with canine digestive systems. Better safe than sorry. Take care, M

Brady
Guest
Brady

Thanks, I will take your advice. Again thanks.

Frank Hollis
Guest
Frank Hollis

From a clinical perspective, and in contrast to humans, there is no scientific evidence linking sodium intakes in dogs with increased risk of hypertension, renal or cardiac disease, or calcium oxalate urolithiasis.

Source: Veterinary Times, 8/3/2010

Hayuitsme
Guest
Hayuitsme

Please double check your facts on Garlic, It seems many authorties disagree with you and claim garlic is toxic to dogs.

Michelle Schenker
Guest
Michelle Schenker

Thank you Hayuitsme,
Yes, we too have read conflicting reports. However, almost every study on pests shows that garlic in very small doses can be beneficial for deflecting fleas, ticks, etc. So, we say, if you are worried, avoid it, but a little, tiny bit might prove very helpful. So proceed with caution.

iOwnLegions
Guest
iOwnLegions

Marijuana treats for your pet will prevent cancer and is the future for animals living longer

Neil Mcginnis
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Neil Mcginnis

All wild animals look for a high fat diet so this information about limiting fat intake is outdated and misguided.

Michelle Schenker
Guest
Michelle Schenker

Thanks for your comment Neil. I agree that wild animals do seek out high fat diets but based on your thoughtful response, I think you would agree that there is a difference between over-processed, highly saturated fats and fats found naturally occurring in nature.

Neil Mcginnis
Guest
Neil Mcginnis
Absolutely you are right. I should have clarified what types of fats. No vegetable seed oils or hydrogenated products. Only organic grass fed butter, lard, coconut oil, and some cheese products and of course pastured pork belly and other high fat foods that my family consumes. I follow the Weston A Price diet which is focused on knowledge gained from studying the diets of more primitive cultures that existed 150 years ago and I imagine that most but not all principles would line up with the primitive diet of canines. *I did not realize that avocado was toxic to them… Read more »
Doggy girl
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Doggy girl

I have fed my dog grapes a number of times, I am worried now that I have read this article what should I do?

Michelle Schenker
Guest
Michelle Schenker

They are primarily a choking hazard, so if your dog is okay now, maybe you just don’t give them grapes again in the future. Take care and thanks for your comment!

Marni
Guest
Marni

Our 9 week old Border Collie puppy, Lola, seems to get into Devon (or bologna) all the time. Is this healthy? Or bad. My sister was wondering that before she gave her German Shepherd dog some. Maybe someone can answer? And also, is “Processed Meat” good for Puppies.

Michelle Schenker
Guest
Michelle Schenker

Hi Marni,
Processed meats are not healthy for dogs because they are very processed (not natural meat at all), have a lot of sodium and also contain nitrates. These are not healthy for dogs or really for humans either so, while your dog can have it occasionally, do not make it a regular treat.

TBot1
Guest
TBot1
I have a quick question. I recently bought a pitbull, and unfortunately was separated from his mother earlier than he should have. Anyway, he is now just over 2 months old. He’s healthy, happy, and I am blessed to have such a wonderful dog. But, there is one thing that does concern me. Since I took in my puppy, he will start shaking very badly. It almost seems like he’s having a mini seizure. I will hold him and it will go away, but it scares me. I went online and read many other pitbull owners who experienced the same… Read more »
Michelle Schenker
Guest
Michelle Schenker

Hi and thank you for your comment. My pitbull mix also trembles a lot. The vet has told me that it is common with very muscular dogs who don’t have much fat on their bones. We got our dog a thunder coat and whenever we put it on her, she calms right down. I would recommend you try it. It amazes me every time! –

Natasha
Guest
Natasha

Garlic onions, chives, and leeks are poisonous.

Natasha
Guest
Natasha

Garlic is more poisonous then onions to your dog. It is part of the nightshade family and is poisonous. Raw eggs can lead to salmonella and e coli risks plus they can mess up your dog’s skin and coat. I’m not sure about cooked potatoes skins but better safe than sorry. Any kind of fruit seeds can be poisonous.

Marni
Guest
Marni

My dog Lola loves raw eggs. So does my Kelpie Stassy. All a fan of the egg-business. And they are not dead :/

samantha
Guest
samantha

Raw eggs are great for dogs. They help dogs put on weigh after disease and they contain proteins and vitamins that are great for skin and coat. Eggs do the same thing for humans and are cosmetic beauty secret. A dog’s digestive tract is different than that of a human. It is more acidic to combat these added risks. Not only that but most eggs nowadays are safe for humans to eat raw.

Melissa
Guest
Melissa
What kills the most dogs is commercial dog food that is full of disgusting crap. I don’t understand why the dog food companies are not being held more responsible for all the damage they are doing. Do research and cook your dog’s food yourself. It’s really easy and will prevent vet bills in the long run amongst other things. And don’t bother asking your vet, they don’t even study nutrition in vet school. In fact, a lot of vet schools are being sponsored by dog food companies. That’s why vets push it so hard. What you save by buying dog… Read more »
Patti Radtke Pirko
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Patti Radtke Pirko
What about beef jerky? I have a neighbor that gives the dogs that and pup o roni luncheon meat. He gave my min pin a pup o roni and he got sick after a couple of hours. He vomited and won’t eat. I gave him over the counter medicine (approved by vet), but he may end up going for a shot. I was just wondering if what my neighbor gave my min pin is what made him sick. My other dog, an Australian Cattle, is just fine with this – she never got sick. I read about the luncheon meat,… Read more »
Michelle Schenker
Guest
Michelle Schenker

Patti, I would recommend that you ask your neighbor not to give your dog Pup-Peroni if it may be making your pup sick. They are safe for many dogs or they would not still be available for sale BUT they do contain many preservatives that may be upsetting your dog’s tummy. Your dog is probably sensitive to it. Better safe than sorry I say!

Kelsea Twigg
Guest
Kelsea Twigg

My 7 month old pup is out of food. He is a medium size pup (shepherd/boxer/pit mix) but I was going to boil hot dogs and cut them up for him until I get more food. Is this OK or not?

Michelle Schenker
Guest
Michelle Schenker

Hi Kelsea,
I would recommend that you not do this. Hot dogs have lots of nitrates which are not good for dogs at all. Even bread or some carrots might be better choices than hot dogs. Hope this helps.

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