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How To Diagnose and Treat Dog Diarrhea

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Dog sick on bedSince ancient times, physicians have looked to stool samples as a reference point for the health of their patients. For animals, such as dogs, referencing stool samples is a more viable option than ever because of the rising costs of healthcare. Those concerned about the health of their animals can learn a lot about them by looking at their stool samples. And when it comes to puppies, what you learn from their stool might even save their lives.

How to Diagnose Dog Diarrhea

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If your dog has diarrhea, obviously he or she will want to go outside more. If your dog is house trained and has more frequent “accidents” than he or she normally does, this is a sign that he may have uncontrollable diarrhea. If your pup is not having accidents but is going outside more often, you may need to check his or her feces to inspect the consistency. It can often be hard to tell if puppies have diarrhea since pups generally have a soft stool to begin with. However, if the diarrhea is almost liquid, this is a sign that something is wrong.

Here’s a quick menu of the article contents below so you can jump to the section you are interested in or keep reading to learn all about this topic!

Types of Dog Diarrhea

Believe it or not, there are several types of diarrhea. It’s important to know the normal state of your dog’s stool so that you can accurately determine if it’s any different than normal. You should also be aware of the normal condition of their gums and eyes for a more accurate assessment.

Soft Stool with No Blood or Mucous

If your dog has soft feces, it may be something as simple as having eaten a new food or an object that wasn’t meant for consumption. However, it may also be a sign of parasites or stress. Monitor your dog closely and seek medical attention if the condition persists or worsens.

Greasy Gray Stool

When dogs have this type of diarrhea, it is usually a sign that they have eaten a greasy food or too much fat. Reduce the fat content of the food your pup consumes to see if this solves the problem.

Black Stool with a Tar Type Texture

When your pup has a black, tarry look to his feces, it’s a sign that there is old blood in his or her system. This may be a sign that the pup ate something that caused internal damage, or that he or she has a serious disease such as cancer, or a tumor. Seek medical attention immediately.

Liquid Diarrhea

Dogs that have liquid diarrhea may have a viral or intestinal infection. Since dogs are at high risk for dehydration in these situations, be sure to monitor the pup closely and use preventative methods of treatment. If the condition persists, seek medical attention.

Mucous

Dogs who develop a stool with a mucous-type membrane or stringy substance may be at serious risk for diseases such as Parvo. It may also be an indication of the presence of parasites. Seek medical attention immediately.

Worms or Other Living Things

If you notice that there are worms or other living things present in your dog’s stool, promptly take him or her to the vet so they can be treated accordingly.

Solid Stool with Fresh Blood

When your pup has any type of blood in their stool, he or she is experiencing a serious health problem. If the blood is fresh, it is a sign that there is currently bleeding inside of your pup. It may be in the large intestine or the anal glands. Your pup may have eaten something that perforated his or her intestinal wall or this may be a sign of the eruption of a tumor or an ulcer. Seek emergency medical attention immediately.

Soft or Runny Stool with Blood or Blood Clots

Bloody diarrhea can be an indication of a serious health problem. That problem can range from something the dog has eaten to more serious conditions like parasites or Parvo. The fact that your pup not only has diarrhea but also has blood in the diarrhea should be taken seriously. The condition may pass with a day or two if the pup has eaten something unhealthy, but if the pup has a disease such as Parvo, the pup can quickly dehydrate and die within a day or two. Seek medical attention immediately.

Diet’s Importance in Dog Diarrhea

With puppies, it can be difficult to assess the true cause of diarrhea because they are very much like human babies: Their system is young enough to have difficulty processing new foods, so any change in diet can cause diarrhea. A few things you can control through their diet to ensure their stomach stays at ease:

Avoid Giving Your Pup Table Scraps

Not only can table scraps cause bad habits such as begging during dinner, but the constant change in food will make it difficult to assess if the pup is having if any health problems.

Keep Your Pup on the Same Diet

Keep your dog on a consistent diet (at least until they are old enough to begin eating adult food). By then, you’ll have seen enough of your pup’s stool samples to be able to establish a baseline of what their stool looks like. If you constantly change his or her diet, there will be no baseline and you will have problems trying to establish whether your pup is actually sick or if the change in stool is due to a change in diet.

Keep a Keen Eye on Your Puppy

Watch your pup closely, especially until they outgrow the chewing stage. Before this stage is over, they will swallow more unhealthy items than you ever thought of and keeping a close watch can save you a lot of worry in the long run.

Treatments for Diarrhea in Dogs

Though most of the cases of diarrhea listed above suggest that you seek medical attention immediately, it’s not uncommon to try to treat a dog’s diarrhea at home before seeking medical attention.

And remember, vets are not cheap so consider getting pet insurance to help offset some of the bills. New to pet insurance? We created a video that breaks down what it is and what to look for when choosing a plan. 

If you plan to treat your dog at home, be prepared to be diligent and ready to seek emergency medical attention should your efforts fail. You should also be aware that diarrhea is the body’s way of ridding itself of some sort of matter, whether it is something the dog ate or a virus that’s working its way through the system. You should also be aware that a virus cannot be stopped, but will run its course; the diarrhea is only a symptom.

Your Primary Goal

The most important thing to remember when it comes to treating the diarrhea is that your primary goal should be to let the body do what it must while preventing any further damage. Many people assume that you must feed the dog something that normally slows down the digestive process, such as cheese. In truth, you don’t want to stop the diarrhea. You do, however, want to prevent the dehydration that diarrhea can cause.

Keeping Your Dog Hydrated

To keep your dog hydrated, you need to make sure he or she has plenty of liquids and electrolytes. Pedialyte and other liquids filled with electrolytes are a wonderful way to help your pup, but you have to get the liquid into the pup’s system. This can be difficult if your pup is not interested in eating or drinking. To force the pup to ingest the liquid, use a syringe:

Place the syringe at the back of the pup’s mouth, near the top of the throat. If the pup has trouble swallowing, massage the throat. This will cause a natural reaction of swallowing. (You can also put the syringe in the back of the pup’s cheek.) If the dog has no problems swallowing, this method may be more comfortable for him or her. Repeat this process every couple of hours.

If the dog is able to eat, give him or her broth to eat. When the dog is able to eat the broth, add boiled chicken and/or rice to the broth. This type of food is easy for the dog to digest and does not have the fat that is often found in beef products. You want to avoid fatty foods that may make the diarrhea worse. Continue upon this course of action until the dog is behaving normally and has solid stool.

Health Risks of Dog Diarrhea

The biggest risk associated with diarrhea in pups is dehydration. However, there are other risks to be concerned about. Continuous diarrhea can cause problems with the digestive tract in general. Something else to consider is contagion. If your pup has uncontrollable diarrhea, they may pass their illness along to other members of your household. Even humans can be infected by some of the illnesses that pups carry, though they will react differently than a dog.

The Parvo virus is an especially contagious virus. Not only can the dog spread it other canine members of your household, but the virus can also be transported through your shoes and clothes to other households and thereby infect other dogs.

Parvo is a virus that is found in the ground and is transmitted through feces. The contagion can last for years and is deadly to puppies under six months old as well as animals that may have problems fighting disease. The only sure way to kill the virus is with household bleach. To be safe, you even need to disinfect your yard where the pup has been. The diarrhea that comes with the Parvo virus can be so watery that you may not even see it in the yard. Spray the entire area to be safe and avoid exposing young pups to the infected area.

For more information on Parvovirus, visit our article on Parvo In Dogs.

Dehydration Due to Diarrhea

Dehydration is one of the worst potential results of diarrhea. Every dog owner should learn how to check for dehydration. To do this, you first need to assess how your dog normally is.

Gums

Check the gums of your dog. They should be solid and shiny with wetness. If you push on the gums, the area that you push on should automatically fill back up with blood. Check your dog’s gums before he or she gets sick so that you have something to compare the results to if he or she does get sick.

Elasticity

Much like humans, the liquids in your pup’s body helps his or her skin to maintain elasticity. If you pinch the skin on your hand, it should go back to its original shape as soon as you let go of the skin. The same is true of your pup, but can be hard to see because of the fur. Grasp the skin on your dog’s neck. When you let go of the skin, it should immediately fall back in its place on the dog’s neck. If the skin maintains a tent-like shape after you let go of it, your pup is dehydrated and needs immediate emergency medical assistance. If you are unable to get to the vet immediately, you can use the treatment method listed above to help with the dehydration. However, you should get to the vet as soon as possible for intravenous assistance. A dehydrated dog can die within a matter of hours.

Antibiotic-Induced Diarrhea

When referring to diarrhea in dogs, it is important to distinguish between diarrhea induced by antibiotics and diarrhea caused by illness. Diarrhea that is caused by antibiotics is often referred to as acute diarrhea since it is sudden in onset and tends to last from a couple of days to a couple of weeks. As with any incidence of diarrhea, antibiotic-induced diarrhea is a symptom of something else happening inside your dog’s system. In the case of antibiotic induced diarrhea though, the cause of system upset is known.

Why Does Antibiotic-Induced Diarrhea Occur?

When dogs (just like people) take antibiotics they can experience side effects including diarrhea. This type of diarrhea occurs because, while antibiotics are designed to kill off bacteria causing the infection (or prevent infection in the case of post-surgery antibiotics,) they can also kill off the beneficial bacteria in your dog’s digestive tract. As the beneficial bacteria numbers in your dog’s intestines declines, the balance of bacteria in the intestines is thrown off and diarrhea results.

Do All Dogs Experience Antibiotic-Induced Diarrhea?

Not all dogs will experience antibiotic-induced diarrhea and there are a number of factors that will determine whether your dog does.

Overall Health

One of the biggest factors influencing whether or not your dog will experience antibiotic-induced diarrhea is their overall health. Some dogs – just like some people – tend to have weaker immune systems and “weaker stomachs.” These dogs are more likely to experience diarrhea as a result of antibiotic use.

Type and Strength of Antibiotic Used

Another major player in determining whether or not your dog will experience diarrhea on antibiotics is the brand of antibiotic used and the strength or dosage of that medication. Certain types of antibiotics are simply stronger in terms of being able to kill off bacteria in a shorter time period, and these antibiotics can quite quickly result in an upset stomach. Additionally, the dosing amount and dosing schedule of antibiotics will play a role in antibiotic-induced diarrhea as well. Dogs that are taking antibiotics three times daily are going to be more prone to side effects from that antibiotic than dogs that are taking that same antibiotic at the same dosage once daily.

Length of Antibiotic Treatment

The longer a dog is exposed to antibiotics the higher the risk that they will experience the dying of beneficial bacteria in their digestive tract that results in diarrhea.

Should I Stop my Dog’s Antibiotic Course if it’s Causing Diarrhea?

Patients are always recommended to finish their recommended course of antibiotics in order for the treatment to be fully effective in killing harmful infection causing bacteria. There is question however, as to whether antibiotic therapy should be continued even if it is resulting in severe diarrhea. The problem in this case is that stopping antibiotics runs the risk of recurring infection; however, continuing the antibiotic may result in severe dehydration and malnutrition.

If your dog is experiencing severe diarrhea as a result of antibiotics, it is always best to consult your veterinarian before stopping your dog’s medication. Your vet may recommend an anti-diarrheal to be taken in conjunction with the current antibiotic so that the current treatment course may continue. Your vet may also recommend switching to another type of antibiotic that has a lesser occurrence of diarrhea. There are a number of antibiotics that are known for being gentler on the stomach and a handful that are known for being particularly harsh. If your dog has had trouble with antibiotic-induced diarrhea before this is worth mentioning to your veterinarian. This type of information can help your vet to select a medication that will be gentle on your dog’s stomach.

Unfortunately, in some circumstances, there is no other option than treatment with the current diarrhea-causing antibiotic. This type of situation does not occur too often but when it does it occurs as the result of targeted medications that lack alternative treatment methods. When this occurs, your veterinarian will assess your overall situation and suggest a course of treatment that is right for you. This course may consist of continuation of the antibiotic and management of the diarrhea or cessation of the antibiotic and pursuit of another treatment course.

What Can I Do to Prepare My Dog For Antibiotics?

In many instances when pet owners know that their dog has a prevalence of antibiotic-induced diarrhea they can begin preparing their dog for antibiotic treatment as soon as they receive a diagnosis. This preparation includes stocking up on a number of items:

Dog Probiotics

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The use of probiotics for dogs has been questioned since little research exists to support its benefit; however, many dog owners that have dogs with a prevalence toward antibiotic-induced diarrhea find that probiotics are very helpful. Probiotics are sold in most pet stores as supplements that can be added to food or ingested in pill form. This supplement introduces tiny living organisms into your dog’s gut by boosting the production of digestive enzymes and improving overall immune functions. One of the most popular canine probiotics currently is made by Purina.

Chicken and Rice or Prescription Food

As with people, maintaining a bland diet is important when gut health is compromised. Most veterinarians will suggest feeding a diet of boiled chicken and white rice in order to keep your dog’s diet as bland as possible. The ratio of chicken to rice in this combination should be 1:3 respectively.

Anti-diarrheal Medication

Always check with your veterinarian before implementing a course of anti-diarrheal medication to your dog. If your vet approves this treatment, then make sure that you have the appropriate medication on hand when your dog is prescribed antibiotics.

Pedialyte

Unflavored Pedialyte is a good tool to have on hand for a dog that is prone to antibiotic-induced diarrhea. Anytime your dog suffers from multiple incidences or prolonged incidences of diarrhea they run the risk of electrolyte imbalance. Offer your dog unflavored Pedialyte to keep their electrolyte levels healthy. If your dog refuses, talk to your veterinarian about other methods for maintaining healthy electrolyte levels in your dog with antibiotic-induced diarrhea.

Prevention of Dog Diarrhea

The best thing that you can do to prevent diarrhea in your dog is to treat it as you would a human. Keep your dog away from stray dogs as much as possible and administer vaccines as scheduled. Be sure to take your dog to the vet for a wellness visit to stave off any issues as soon as possible.

And be sure to stay with food your dog and stick with it. Change brands if your pet develops allergies, but try to stick with a quality dog food — visit our review on Taste of The Wild vs. Blue Buffalo for two top options — and do not feed your dog table scraps.

Has your dog experienced dog diarrhea?

Alex's first dog was a dalmatian named Domino, who at the time belonged to his girlfriend (now wife) Michelle. Alex first met Domino in Redondo Beach, California and they quickly became best pals. In North Carolina, a black lab mix, Storm, was added to the family. Domino lived to be 14 years old, and Storm 9, and Alex looks back fondly at all the love and happiness these pups added to his life over the years. Alex now lives happily in Winston-Salem, NC with his wife Michelle and their two dogs Bella (yellow lab mix) and Lily (Brown Carolina dog), and he doesn't take for granted for a second how much meaning canines add to his life, and how many lessons he learns from their love, happiness, and eagerness to live life to the fullest.

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48 Comments on "How To Diagnose and Treat Dog Diarrhea"

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Rob

Tteddy is a fool

William McCormick
William McCormick

My dog is 16 years old she’s a short hair Labrador she’s been dehydrated I’ve been giving her coconut water with a syringe now she has black tar stool movement. What else do I need to do. I’ve been feeding her alpo chop house in a can .shes starting to move around a little bit I keep her in the house cause she’s blind in both eyes.

Not TTeddy
Not TTeddy

TTeddy has some horrible advise on here

Silva Green
Silva Green

My Rhino is an American Bulldog. He’s 6 1/2 months old and weighs 70lbs. For the last month his stool has been really loose. He’s eating and drinking normally, he’s been to the vet several times, taken the pro-biotics been on the chicken and rice deal and still the same thing. Should I be concerned?

Kimberly Alt
Kimberly Alt
When we take my sister’s 5 1/2 year old yellow lab for a walk he has runny stool. However, when he goes at home in the backyard it is typically more solid. To be honest, I’m not quite sure why this occurs. Perhaps it’s something with how active he is at the time he is going. If your dog has had loose stool for the last month it may be a good idea to call your vet and ask him/her. If something is wrong with your pup it’s better to discover it now than later. Best of luck and keep… Read more »
Barb
Barb

Last sentence is missing a coma, my dog does not speak it only barks.

Kimberly Alt
Kimberly Alt

Hahaha, thanks for the help Barb. We’ll be sure to update that!

TTeddy
TTeddy
This needs a lot more research. For instance: “Not only can table scraps cause bad habits such as begging during dinner, but the constant change in food will make it difficult to assess if the pup is having if any health problems.” Firstly, table scraps are fine in moderation. No cooked bones! This should have been mentioned! How does it make it difficult to assess any health problems? “Keep your dog away from stray dogs as much as possible and administer vaccines as scheduled. ” This is so so so wrong!!! Under NO circumstances should you administer vaccines to an… Read more »
Kimberly Alt
Kimberly Alt
Thank you for your comment. I think there may be a misunderstanding here on what our article says and we’d like to further address the points you disagree on. Feeding table scraps makes it difficult to assess health problems because the dog has eaten many things instead of his own food. If you’ve given him various items from your plate and he suddenly becomes ill it’s difficult to know precisely which food caused the illness. We don’t say you should administer vaccines to an unwell animal. For prevention, you should keep your dog up to date on his vaccines and… Read more »
TTeddy
TTeddy

When you say “keep your dog vaccines up to date”. Vaccines are over rated and many dogs are over vaccinated. Vaccinations are the number one cause of immunity problems. Vaccinations last minimum 3 years, most of the time they will last a life time.

I would NEVER recommend using bleach anywhere around animals. That is just asking for more health problems.

Antibiotics should be a last resort as these too can cause immunity problems.

Louise
Louise

I have a 15 week SBT with runs I’ve taken him to vets who gave pro bind yesterday today he’s just payed about it is a warm day thou but I’m worried.

TTeddy
TTeddy

Hi Louise, How is he doing now?

melissa cleare
melissa cleare
Hi my dog sizzle 7 month old pit has diarrhea when I came back from New York on Friday I left him with my son. So the day which is Wednesday evening Thursday morning he’s vomited 3x he was eating fine he’s running around fine he started to slack off on his eating since he started to vomit but the vomit was, when he drank water it come up like it was brown. Would this still be the food color of what he ate earlier? His vet doesn’t open until like 9 o’clock in the morning I’m kind of worried… Read more »
Kimberly Alt
Kimberly Alt

Hi Melissa, sorry we didn’t see this before 9am. I hope you have been able to contact your vet by now. If this ever occurs again I suggest calling an emergency vet. Vomiting and diarrhea can be very dangerous and life threatening. Please let us know how your pup is doing. Hope all is well.

melissa cleare
melissa cleare

Sizzle is doing well today I gave him chicken and rice 4 xs today no vomiting and no diarrhea I really believe he ate something bad while I was in New York when my son was watching him.

TTeddy
TTeddy

No rice, it’s bad for them. Glad he’s ok. Really his immune should have been strong enough to get over whatever is was. I would work on his immune so it doesn’t happen again.

Kimberly Alt
Kimberly Alt

Rice is actually an okay food to give your dog. Mix it with some chicken and it can help a dog’s upset tummy.

Kimberly Alt
Kimberly Alt

So glad to hear he is doing better. Hope he continues to be on the up and up!

Roseann Pawlowski
Roseann Pawlowski

My 7 month old blue heeler has had diarrhea for three days now. Yesterday I gave him chicken and rice for dinner and his morning poop was pretty solid. Gave him chicken and rice for breakfast and his next pop was firmed but a little soft, just gave him the same for dinner and as soon as he was done eating he had to go out. Poop was very runny again. Is it time to see the vet or just keep feeding him the chicken and rice?

Kimberly Alt
Kimberly Alt

I would give your vet a call and explain your situation. See what they suggest and go from there. Best of luck!

Simone B
Simone B

Hey guys my akita pup has bloody diarrhea for about 2.5 days still eating, drinking, high energy as normal trying absolutely no food for the rest of the night, what do you think?

Kimberly Alt
Kimberly Alt

Blood in your dog’s stool is never good. Take your dog to the vet ASAP.

Simone B
Simone B

Yes, we went this morning everything checked out. My fur baby got pills, one is an antibiotic and the other to help make him more solid so I’ll see what this does, if not better in 2 days I’ll have the vet run his blood.

sissy1
sissy1

I have two puppies both are sick with diarrhea took them to the vet they are on meds since last Tuesday night. Stools have gone from water to soft but not solid, the little female is done with her meds. Should I call the vet since it has not cleared up?

Kimberly Alt
Kimberly Alt

Yes, it’s always best to call your vet when you think something is wrong with your pup. Better safe than sorry. Your vet won’t mind you calling. They want to help your pup feel better! Hope all goes well!

Angela
Angela
I have an eleven week old German shepherd. I just adopted him on Monday. This morning he threw up and hasn’t eaten all day other than my bigger dogs omega 3 chewy. He has had dark black slimy diarrhea all day and you can hear his belly bubbling. He will periodically play with my other dog but is sleeping a lot more than he has been. He doesn’t seem dehydrated, I can pinch the back of his neck and it will go back down. I also go him to lick on an ice cube and made him take 2 syringes… Read more »
Reltih
Reltih

“If your dog refuses talk to your veterinarian about other methods for” …

Ricki Rivera
Ricki Rivera

I gave my dog some white rice the other day. And once in a blue moon, I like to give her a hard boiled egg. I noticed today, about 10 minutes ago, she was pooping, diarrhea. As i was cleaning it up, I noticed LONG mucus, clear mucus. I’m a little worried….

Sadie Cornelius
Admin
Sadie Cornelius

Ricki, sorry to hear your dog is not feeling well! We hope she’s doing better and if not, please go see a vet who can better diagnose and treat your pup! Thanks for reading CanineJournal and bet wishes to you and your dog!

nicki
nicki

hi
my 7 months old puppy had diarrhea, we think after eating sheep poo after a walk. it was watery and he was not himself, we saw the vet who gave him electrolyte sachets, and the diarrhea stopped, and he picked up. he saw the vet for a check over and they said he wasn’t dehydrated. My question is, how long should it be until he has a poo? it has been 24 hours, and he has been having 4 small meals of chicken and rice since his last soft but not loose bowel movement? he is well, drinking and peeing.

Jack
Jack

We are seeing a huge uptick in cases of dogs sick with Porcine Diarrhea Virus which may be connected to pet food that has been made in China. Stop buying dog food (or people food) from China. The US has plenty of safe and delicious foods. Read more about US pet retailers ban on dog treats from China. http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2014/06/18/fda-cant-say-treats-arent-from-china.html

Wendy
Wendy
Sara Logan Wilson
Admin
Sara Logan Wilson

Hi Wendy, we recommend taking your dog to the vet as soon as possible. Blood in the stool is a sign of a serious health problem, and we are not in a position to diagnose the cause. Good luck!

cali2013
cali2013

I have a 5 year old Chihuahua and she is sick with diarrhea. It's real watery and she isn't eating or drinking any water and I don't know what to do. I very concerned about her what should I do please help.

Amber
Amber
My husband and I have an eight year old female yellow Lab who is having some diarrhea with blood in it. We have her on Eukenuba Senior Maintenance and she has been on that food for just over a year. She has never had a problem with it before. Her energy level is the same as she's always been (a lab that even at eight acts like a hyper puppy), she is still eating well, and she is drinking her water. Nothing is different except that she is having the diarrhea. It's only been a day so I'm just going… Read more »
TTeddy
TTeddy

What she needs is some real food which carnivores are suppose to eat, not some processed food all its life.

Chris Rinoz
Chris Rinoz

How is she doing?

Judy
Judy

My dog has been on antibiotics for eight days. On our walk this afternoon her poop started out solid and the last half was very soft. I would like to hear some comments about giving her some plain yogurt. It also seems I have heard of using pumpkin for diarrhea.

Maureen
Maureen
Michelle R.
Michelle R.
Pom mommy
Pom mommy
Anonymous
Anonymous
It's never fun to deal with a dog that has diarrhea. Not only does it break your heart to see your baby in such distress, but it's certainly not fun to clean up if there's an accident. Even if your dog still lets you know that it's time to go out, you may not make it out in time. However, you still need to pay close attention to the movements the dog is having. Diarrhea is serious because it can be caused by an underlying condition and can cause dehydration if left untreated. I've been around dogs my entire life… Read more »
Jeannie
Jeannie
I have a 10 yr old miniature Winnie and rat terrier mixed. I took her to the vet Thursday cause she was wobbling and falling over. She couldn’t stand up. After she got her balance she was ok for a little bit but still wobbling. He did blood work and it came back ok. He put her on metacam to see if it would help. Thought it might be her back. Last night she went outside almost every hour. She has diarrhea that looks like black tar and now she is throwing up foam with blood in it. I am… Read more »
Kimberly Alt
Kimberly Alt

What a scary situation, so sorry your pup is ill. Hopefully your vet has a solution for her today! Best of luck, we’re thinking of you.

Anonymous
Anonymous

My dog is sick with diarrhea and it is gross. I am trying to keep him outside until he is feeling better but will have to let him in tonight when it gets cold. Anyone have any suggestions for how to make him better? I left a bowl of water out there in hopes that might help…

Anonymous
Anonymous
Anonymous
Anonymous
Anonymous
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