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Eight Things You Need To Know Before Buying a Shock Collar

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Shock Collar for DogsWhether you have a pup with a penchant for persistent barking, or you’d like to train your dog to stay in the yard, you may have considered a shock collar, electronic collar (e-collar) or remote training collar. As with any method of behavior modification, there are pros and cons. Ultimately, it’s up to you to choose what method works best for you and your pets, so we’ve laid out the facts to help you decide.

Best Shock Collar For Dogs: Petsafe Yard & Park Rechargeable Collar Review

Petsafe Yard & Park Rechargeable Dog Training CollarView the Petsafe Dog Training Collar on Amazon

If you do decide that a shock collar is the right training device for your dog, we recommend the PetSafe Yard & Park Remote Dog Trainer (shown right) for its eight levels of correction, beep-only option, rechargeable battery and 400-yard range. It’s a little more expensive than some of the other electronic options out there, but it gives you more control and therefore a more positive training experience for your pup. It also allows you to train your dog with a much more mild tingle on levels one–three, rather than starting out with an intense shock.

How Does A Shock Collar Work?

Shock collars are a type of aversive training initially used in the 1960s to train hunting dogs. These days, shock collars are often used to curb a variety of stubborn and unwanted behaviors in family dogs, from excessive barking to food aggression, as well as to train pups to stay safely within a property line or to stick close by while off leash.

Shock collars are not intended as a punishment, but more as a deterrent to train negative or unsafe behavior out of a dog. The theory is that your dog will associate the unwanted behavior with an uncomfortable shock and stop doing it until they no longer require the reminder.

The shock administered by an approved shock collar is safe, so while it is certainly enough to get your dog’s attention and deter certain behaviors, it won’t do any lasting physical harm. With most shock collars, there are several levels of enforcement, so you can set the level to reprimand the unwanted behavior accordingly. For example, many shock collars will administer a beep and/or a vibration as a warning before an actual shock is delivered to your dog. The beep also allows you to give a verbal command (“No!” or “Down!”) with the warning beep or vibration to further disrupt the unwanted behavior. With boundary training (often marketed as an electric fence or an invisible fence), the shock collar is triggered by wires placed underground along the property line so the dog learns exactly how far they can go before they reach the boundary.

Once set to “shock” mode, there are usually varying levels of intensity delivered by a two-pronged device attached to a dog collar. If you’re using a shock collar as a barking deterrent, the collar responds to the vibration of your dog’s vocal cords. If you’re using the collar to deter behavioral issues like food aggression, jumping or leash aggression, a remote control allows you to administer the shock in conjunction with the unwanted behavior.

Eight Things You Need to Know Before Buying a Shock Collar

We have chosen four pros and four cons that we think everyone should consider before using or purchasing a shock collar for a dog. Please be sure to read these carefully, and feel free to ask us any questions you have about the pros and cons of using a shock collar.

Pros of Shock Collars For Dogs

1. Adjustable Intensity

Most modern shock collars give you the flexibility of a warning beep or vibration mode, and adjustable settings on the levels of shock, which can be comforting to people are who are on the fence about using a shock collar. Other collars, such as spray collars, which administer a harmless but foul-smelling blast up a dog’s snout, are usually not adjustable.

2. Fast Results

Some pet owners report that it only took a few shocks to correct an unwanted behavior in their dog and after that, the beep or vibration was warning enough. Shock collars can also be very effective at keeping your dog on your property, which will help keep them safe while giving them freedom. Of course, more stubborn dogs may take longer to train.

3. You Don’t Need to Be Present

Shock collars, when used to control chronic barking, work even while you’re away from home or inside the house. This can be especially helpful if you’ve had neighbors complain about your dog’s loud protests while you’re out. The same goes for shock collars as boundary control, although they do require some hands-on training. Of course, we don’t recommend leaving your dog unattended outside for extended periods of time, with or without a shock collar.

4. Affordable

A shock collar can be a cheaper alternative to a professional dog trainer or a fence. Shock collars range from $25 to about $200, depending on features such as remote control, adjustable warning/shock levels, a range of distances (usually 30 to 400 yards), and the number of collars included.

Cons of Shock Collars For Dogs

1. The Shock

Most pet owners can’t fathom causing pain to their pet. But even with the ability to control the intensity of the shock, you are still using aversive behavior modification. Many dog trainers choose positive reinforcement (reward) as a means of behavior modification over negative feedback.

2. The Fear

Fear in dogs can be dangerous, so you never want to train a dog with fear. With shock training, some dogs may learn to fear people, objects, or situations they associate with the collar. One pet owner we know said their dog refused to go outside after training with the invisible fence they installed and started urinating in the house instead of going to the back door.

3. Over-Correction

Without you there to control when a shock is administered, automatic bark collars and electric fences may deliver shocks unintentionally or too often. This unnecessary shock could confuse your dog by “correcting” a problem that was not even there.

4. No Positive Reward

On their own, shock collars don’t reinforce good behavior with a positive reward such as your affection, verbal approval (“Good boy!”) or a tasty treat. So while a shock collar may effectively deter negative behaviors like jumping on visitors or running after the mail carrier, it doesn’t reward positive behavior such as sitting patiently or obeying a command to “Stay!”. As with any training, you should always reinforce positive behavior with a reward of affection, playtime or a small treat.

E-Collar Training and Introduction Video

Learn about training your dog using an e-collar. There are some helpful tips in this video.

Grow Your Bond With Your Dog

Remember, using a shock collar doesn’t make you a bad pet parent, and it doesn’t mean you are torturing your dog. It is unlikely that an electronic training collars would destroy your relationship with your dog. In fact, shared training sessions could improve your bond with one another. No matter what training tools you decide to use, the intended purpose is to help your dog, whether it’s to stop him from barking unnecessarily, or to keep him from harm’s way. Keep that in mind when using a shock collar or any training tool.

Have you had success using a shock collar on your dog?

The information contained in this article and website is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional safety advice; it is provided for educational purposes only.

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.


About Sara Logan Wilson
Sara is a writer for Canine Journal. She adores dogs and recently adopted a rescue pup named Beamer. Whole she may be adjusting to life with another being to care for, she needed no time to adjust to all the extra love.
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244 Comments on "Eight Things You Need To Know Before Buying a Shock Collar"

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Stevie
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Stevie
If you own a intelligent dog a shock collar can destroy his trust in humans period. I have owned Dobermans For years and my last one is very dominate and bossy so I tried the collar on low since the sound did nothing. He knew instantly that I was the one that controlled the shock. After one shock I couldn’t even attemp to collar him again as he groweled when he seen the collar . He then became more dominate than he was. I had to rework everything with him from putting a leash on to getting him to listen… Read more »
GEORGIA EVANS
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GEORGIA EVANS
I have had three Chocolate Labrador Retrievers. As pups these guys are full of more energy than most and can be stubborn when they set their sights on something. My first Lab and my heart dog that I lost two years ago at 14 was a beautiful, big boy that was the typical Lab pup. I was always against shock collars, thinking they were cruel. We lived on 11 acres on the side of a mountain in Montana so traffic was never an issue. One day Dusty had spied something across a dirt road and took off after it, refusing… Read more »
Melly
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Melly

I have a 5 month American bulldog who digs in the back yard. I can see how an e-collar can retrain this behavior.
On another note,
He sleeps with me and every night, we have been playfully wrestling for my side of the bed.
Last night, I pinned him down like I normally do and he very aggressively growled. So I held him down and verbally corrected.
I’m thinking of putting him in his crate for the night, but only temporarily. After a few nights of crate sleeping, I’d like to bring him back and see if he shows aggression again.
Any thoughts?

Gary Gromer
Guest
Gary Gromer

My female lab chases after dogs at the dog park and nips them. Then the fight is on. She’s so far away yelling won’t help. I’ve ordered a shock collar. So I’m thinking I’ll watch her and give her a shock when she nips the other dog. Good plan?

Aaron DeLaGarza
Guest
Aaron DeLaGarza
Hi, I have a pitbul who is friendly up until he has a toy. Then no human, other than myself, or other animal can approach him without him growling; getting up quickly and moving in a negative fashion, he just recently nipped at my fiancé when she tried to take his toy. She said she wasn’t being foul with him either, but he kept growling. I’ve had him for 8years but only started coexisting with my fiancé a year ago, so I had no idea he has this side of him. He’s the sweetest dog otherwise. He just gets territorial… Read more »
GEORGIA EVANS
Guest
GEORGIA EVANS

this is resource guarding and can be changed easily with positive reinforcement – please do not put a shock collar on your dog

Kimberly Alt
Editor

A shock collar can be used for many unwanted behaviors, this being one of them. If you’d like, you can try a shock collar out. We also recommend reading this article, https://www.caninejournal.com/aggressive-dog-training-tips/. It may spark an idea for how to help your dog. Glance through our Behavior section for other tips as well, https://www.caninejournal.com/category/training/behavior/.

Kevin McComas
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Kevin McComas

I have a 3 year old female yorkie shitzsu mix that attacks, for no apparent reason a much older male yorkie. Would a shock collar help in the situation and would there be any chance the other dog would sense any of the effects of the shock collar?

Dan
Guest
My dog was a nightmare. Would bolt at any opportunity. Jump up on everyone and dear Lord if there was a squirrel he would lose his mind. We were very close to giving him up. He only had to be shocked a few times. I started with beep/vibration and when he didn’t respond to the stimulus I shocked him. He now responds to the vibration immediately. Now we go on leash free walks and he plays in the yard without fence. That squirrel still makes him crazy but he stops after getting about 20 feet from me without the collar… Read more »
Beth
Guest
Beth

I have a 7 month old Great Dane. He jumps and nips a lot. He didn’t start until he was about 5 months old. I’ve taken him to classes at petsmart and tried positive reinforcement when he sits and is calm but it hasn’t worked. I’ve tried time out and that hasn’t worked. The trainer is against a shock collar so I’m very hesitant. Any suggestions?

Kaylia Mendoza
Guest
Kaylia Mendoza
Hi there, I have a 4 year old Shiweenie dog and a 2 year old Samoyed, both of them have an issue with extreme barking while we are not at home. We have tried the spray bottles, kenneling, coin cans, positive reinforcement training, and taking them to dog parks and for extremely long walks before we leave to tire them out. It doesn’t seem to be working, and now our neighbors have filed a complaint about them. Some neighbors have taken the liberty of coming to our door and yelling for them to stop. (We had a puppy cam installed… Read more »
Kris
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Kris

Hi. I have a neighbor whose dog cries several times every night. Sometimes I believe it shocks the dog every once in a while without the dog barking. I sleep with my window open. It breaks my heart. What should I do? It’s very sad to me.

Shannon Burk
Guest
Shannon Burk

If you feel you have a good relationship with the neighbor, Talk to the neighbor, perhaps they are not aware… If you think the dog is being abused in any way contact Animal Welfare immediately. Sad that the dog is left outside all the time.

Margaret Bryant
Guest
Margaret Bryant

I have recently visited a professional trainer that uses a shock collar and I am very nervous about this method. Is this inhumane?

Kimberly Alt
Guest
Kimberly Alt
Shock collars are commonly used to train dogs. Shock collars are not meant to cause pain so we do not consider them to be inhumane. However, if used improperly, they can definitely escalate to that. Shock collars should not be used at high enough levels to conduct any type of harm. We believe shock collars are meant to cause the dog to notice the feeling of the shock and stop the behavior. It may alarm the dog because the shock comes suddenly but it should not hurt him or her. Think of when you touch someone and you accidentally shock… Read more »
becky
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becky

Hi, I have a one year old female Doberman we got from a lady. We’ve had her for 3 months now. We got her fixed a month ago. She has started to play bite and gets carried away. She gets on the bed and just bites at my hands and feet. I have tried everything to get her to stop. She doesn’t seem to care about the word no. Would the shock collar be good for her in this situation?

Kimberly Alt
Guest
Kimberly Alt

Have you tried all of the tips in this article? https://www.caninejournal.com/how-to-stop-a-dog-from-biting/

Laura
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Laura
Hi just wondering if I should give the collar a try. I have a cross mix breed but quite large since I got him as I rescued him and he is deaf. Now I have spent a lot of time with him and I also have a young daughter 4 years old. He has become very aggressive with his food. He bit me trying to put his bowl down so now I put the food down open the door then I go out as he scared, sorry to swear, but he has scared the living crap out of me. I… Read more »
Kimberly Alt
Guest
Kimberly Alt

Hi Laura, it could be worth a try. Each dog is different so it’s hard to say if a shock collar will work on your dog without attempting it. Let us know how it goes and best of luck!

Joyce Warren
Guest
Joyce Warren
I adopted a 1 1/2 year-old Akbash stray from the local shelter. She had probably been kicked out of some sheep herding job – most likely because she wasn’t aggressive enough. While she was reasonably friendly, she was indifferent to my opinion at the start and praise had no effect on her. In my part of the world, chasing livestock and game is a shooting offense sanctioned by law. Since she was used to measuring her territory in Colorado counties, my 80 acres were tiny for her. I tried getting her used to boundaries using a 30′ leash and sharp… Read more »
An Jesse
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An Jesse

Thank you so much for writing this. My poodle puppy likes to herd cows, llamas & deer (yes, poodle herder- we find it incredibly funny that she herds but incredibly dangerous). We also live in remote Colorado where dogs are shot. We work as land surveyors so she needs to listen to “come”. Even treats couldn’t deter her from having a good “herd”. Every other command is obeyed but this one… I am happy it worked for you and will now give it a go.

Travis Bouck
Guest
Travis Bouck
Live on a farm. Had one dog 1 year and a bit (lab/Bernese) and thought it was lonely when we are gone often during the days. Now have 7 month old German Shepard also. Problem is that the two of them now run off and have started killing neighbor’s sheep. He will shoot them next time and I do understand that position. They shoot coyotes all the time to protect the herd. I never allowed dogs when we lived in town because I believe a big dog should have a large area to roam. Unfortunately, now I am tying the… Read more »
Beth
Guest
Beth
Hi, we too have lived on acreages and have used shock collars and invisible fence, you can buy them to work up to 100 acres or more. This has allowed our dogs a lot of freedom, and they have learned (with proper training) very quickly, I have to say this has changed their lives as well as ours, I wouldn’t be without this system now and we have used it for over 10 years. We have Rottweiler dogs and they can be very stubborn but have adapted very well to this system. That being said I also would never leave… Read more »
Amy
Guest

Control your dogs and keep them on your property or get rid of them. It seems “cruel” for you to tie them up but it’s not cruel for them to KILL your neighbor’s animals? Your neighbor has every right to shoot them and you would rather risk your dogs dying than restraining them or giving them to someone who will actually care about them. What’s wrong with you?

Kimberly Alt
Guest
Kimberly Alt

The only solution we can think of is putting a fence up. This will keep the dogs where they’re allowed to be. It may be pricey to put a fence up around your entire farm so the fence may not be as large of an area as they’re used to. Best of luck and let us know how it goes!

Lyn
Guest
We just adopted a rescued Catahoula, he is about 80 lbs. and 2 to 4 years old. We have about 5 acres fenced around the home with hog wire so the rabbits, cats, etc. can get thru but not a large dog. Problem is he goes ballistic running when he gets loose and has gotten loose on a busy main road, the Rock Mountains, and here at home. If he was able to get into one of the pastures there is no telling where he may end up. He will not stop for any commands until he is exhausted. We… Read more »
Fari GM
Guest
Fari GM

I have a 4 year old siberian husky. (We got her recently 2 months ago) Who barks and howls, every time we leave her alone at home. People started complaining that she goes like this for hours, until we are back. She is sweet with other dogs and people, but we have been having so many complaints, that I’m thinking to buy her the shock collar. Would be a good idea for the type of behavior?
Welcome for anymore ideas.
Thanks

Tanya Metzger
Guest
Tanya Metzger

Hi Fari. This is actually a pretty normal behavior for a husky. Have you tried leaving the radio or a TV on? It sometimes helps curb the separation anxiety and the constant crying. Ours will bark and cry, scatter the trash can contents all over the house, and clear canisters, coffee, or anything else off of the counters and table if we don’t leave the tv on. Not the best solution maybe but it works. Good luck

Shannon Burk
Guest
Shannon Burk

Tanya, I agree with you 100% I have 2 Huskys, and when we leave, we leave the TV on for them and they love it.

Josh Lebica
Guest
Josh Lebica

My two dogs won’t stop fighting each other when it comes to jealousy. And now, they both drew a little blood or more. Is a shock collar the right thing to use to stop them from doing this. For instance, they will growl at each other for a second or two before the fight, should I shock them there, or when they’re fighting? Please help.

Janice
Guest
Janice
I have the same problem. I have an 8 year old chow beagle mix who I’ve had for 7 years and I just rescued a year old beagle who I believe came from an abusive situation just by how he acts. My dogs have a love hate relationship. For the most part they get along but sometimes the beagle wants me all to himself and attacks the older one. They recently got into a fight two days ago at 2:30 a.m. I have no idea who or what started the fight but it got ugly and my older one bit… Read more »
zcsnightmare
Guest
zcsnightmare

I would recommend that you attempt to physically intervene by putting something in-between the two when the behavior begins. A shock collar could work, but a lot of times it can elevate aggression and fighting could be more severe.

Also spray & noise cans, which doesn’t inflict pain. Pain can trigger defensive aggression.

Kimberly Alt
Guest
Kimberly Alt

We would suggest shocking them when the behavior begins, aka with the growling. Then they will associate the beginning of a fight as a bad thing and not acceptable so they don’t even begin fighting. Best of luck and keep us posted on the the progress!

Sarah
Guest
Sarah
We have a four year old Airedale. We adopted him 10 months ago and suspect he was “too much” for his previous owners. He has a big personality, is bright, affectionate and intelligent and well socialized with people and other dogs. But, outside, he is totally unreliable. We took him to classes over the winter and although he was top dog in his indoor school, he is a different dog outside. We are experienced dog owners and have always used positive reinforcement to great effect. But this dog is different! We can’t let him off his lead as he has… Read more »
zcsnightmare
Guest
zcsnightmare
It can definitely help if you know what you’re doing. I would recommend researching proper training methods for shock collar (if you’re referring to a remote shock collar) use. Improper shock collar use is very common and can be hard on the dog. I’ve used one on a couple of my dogs for similar circumstances. (I prefer the ones with the vibrate warning option than beeping). Worked great when used properly and they understand what’s going on. Best to start from lowest setting and slowly work up to what is enough to get the dog’s attention. I’d recommend, if you… Read more »
Kimberly Alt
Guest
Kimberly Alt

You can try a shock collar and see if it helps. Some dogs respond well to shock collars while others do not. Unfortunately, you don’t find this out until after you’ve purchased one and tried it on your dog.

Lalala
Guest
Lalala
My dog chases small animals outside, including neighborhood cats. He chased and killed a groundhog today 🙁 which makes me think his chasing is not as innocent as I assumed. He is extremely sweet and harmless towards other dogs and humans, and only gets crazy when he encounters a squirrel or similarly-sized animal outdoors. I don’t want him hurting another critter or someone’s kitty. He is a scaredy cat and would respond very quickly to a collar, maybe even if it was in beep mode (he’s terrified of our fire alarm). Is a shock collar a good idea for when… Read more »
Kimberly Alt
Guest
Kimberly Alt

If you think he will respond quickly to the shock collar then it doesn’t hurt to give it a try!

Kimberly Jackson
Guest
Kimberly Jackson
Help please! 3 barking small house dogs. Minipooddle a rat terrier and their pup mix. They don’t listen to me tell them No with the barking. Other than the barking they are well minding dogs. They obey all other commands. I want to get shock collars. I tried the warning beep type but that was useless on them. They barked for 2 to 4 seconds then they get shocked. That’s too much barking before the correction. My mom has one and I don’t know the brand, but need to know because it shocks right away and it works great for… Read more »
Suzanne
Guest
Suzanne
I have a 4 year old lab Newfoundland but I have never been able to train to stop barking and charging at neighbors. There is a fenced-in yard but it seems like the shock collar I have is not working. Last Thursday he was so riled up that he ran over a little Chihuahua and fractured his skull but he is home now. He is doing good but for the moment he is blind. I still can’t seem to get the lab to quit charging at neighbors and the shock collar that has 10 different settings doesn’t seem to be… Read more »
zcsnightmare
Guest
zcsnightmare

Newfoundland and mixes typically have a lot of dense fur, which insulates them from correction. Make sure collar is properly fitted. If needed, trim area where box usually hangs (most likely bottom of neck, under chin.)

PMH
Guest

You need professional help with this dog before he harms more dogs or people. A good trainer will work out a comprehensive training plan including tons of exercise, positive reinforcement training, and electric collar to supplement. Half measures won’t work If you want to keep this dog.

Lake Forest
Guest
Lake Forest
My wife and I have a Bichon Poodle (BP) and a mutt. The BP is a runner, best dog in the world, aside from this. Yesterday our 2 year old let the dogs out of the house. They ran outside of our community and onto a very large highway almost causing an accident. I hate the thought of using the shock collar, but we have already tried training programs. The BP is a runner. Does everyone think a shock collar would help? The BP is the runner and the mutt is a puppy who just follows the BP. I think… Read more »
Rotti
Guest
Rotti
I use a petsafe invisible fence system which works wonderfully. It is a type of shock collar, but not the same as sort where you have to push the button to control the shock. It uses a radio broadcast that beeps when your dog is nearing the boundary and then shocks them if they continue. It has trained all five of my dogs to not leave the perimeter I have decided. You can set the boundary and also if you have a very very large yard (like me) you can add a second system to allow more space for them… Read more »
Carrie Figlinski
Guest
Carrie Figlinski
I have a 6 months old mix breed. They believe she is border collie and german shepherd. She has started to herd me and my daughter. And it is starting to get a little frustrating. We have tried a few methods to get her to stop, but it seems to be getting worse. It has gotten to the point my daughter refuses to go near the dog. Which isn’t good since she picked her out. The only method I have not tried is a shock collar of types. She also has barking issues as well and we got a vibrate… Read more »
CharleeR
Guest
CharleeR

People that don’t have the property, time and energy to keep up to a herding dog, should not have them. They are bred to herd, and they NEED to work at something. They are meant to herd sheep or cattle, not be cooped up in a house all the time or they will go crazy and drive you crazy. If you decide you really want this dog; YOU will have to modify your behaviour to give the dog the stimulation it requires.

YK
Guest
We have the same mixed breed dog who is 8. We’ve had a pure breed border collie, a pure breed German, and a pure Aussie. Those are all strong drive herders and if you use a shock collar to deter your dog from doing what it is instinctively bred to do thru long lines of genetics, well that would be torture and a terrible idea! Please do not do that. The puppy just wants “work” – and when you don’t find her “work” she will make anything “her job”. That dog is not getting enough work and stimulation. They take… Read more »
anne
Guest
anne

Not trying to sound harsh, but since your puppy’s instincts as a working
dog are so strong, why not let her live a very useful & happy life on a farm
or wherever her talents are needed.

Upsetatitall
Guest
Upsetatitall

I have a pit/heeler mix pup that leads me through a merry chase through out unincorporated town. She also somehow learned to potty then ask to go out. A shock collar was recommended, but I have never used one. I have a fenced area I was using for chickens, but can use for the pup, but, the other dogs run through the property, with the exception of my carin, he loves to chase cars. I thought to use one on the pit and carin, the other dogs listen to me. Any advice?

Vince
Guest
Vince
Not all dogs will learn the same way. Some breeds are more stubborn than others. For example, my golden retriever, I never used a shock collar on. That breed is bred for obedience. However my husky is a stubborn princess and needed a different form of obedience as positive reinforcement did not work. I used a shock collar on her to deter her from unwanted behaviors as well as to help with off leash training (again, wasn’t needed for my golden). When using the shock collar though, I recommend having a form of positive reinforcement with you (treats, ball, toy)… Read more »
Natalie Robinson
Guest
Natalie Robinson
Hi there, we have a Yorkshire Terrier cross with a Sydney Silky, we got him when he was about 16 weeks, which has caused some behavior issues as his personality had already developed quite a bit. He is now 5.5 years old and loves to bark at our neighbors – and I mean bark. It’s not aggressive, it’s more of a ‘hello, I’m here’ kind of bark. But obviously for the neighborhood it’s not ideal at 7am! When he barks, he really goes for it, he has a loud strong bark and has an undertone of a howl to the… Read more »
Kimberly Alt
Guest
Kimberly Alt

Hi Natalie, I suggest you read this article. It’s about collars for dogs who bark. Hope it helps!
https://www.caninejournal.com/no-bark-dog-collar/

Brooke
Guest
Brooke
I have a 6 month old chocolate lab. He is a good boy and listens mostly. He jumps on our 10 and 6 year old children and nips at them and bites at their clothes. He is slowly getting better with this, however, he is now starting to bark and nip at me when I redirect him or say no. More recently when he jumped on the bed and I told him to get down, it’s happened twice, he started barking at me, jumping around and trying to bite at me. He seems like he is upset and not just… Read more »
Vince
Guest
Vince
It sounds to me as he is not being aggressive but does not know the limits to what is accepted as play and what is not. I work with up to about 120 dogs a day and on occasion we will get a lot of labs [I have one myself]. It is very common in their breed to bark (sometimes appearing aggressively) when they want to play or want something. A good solution is to make sure they know it is not okay. A good way to handle your issue is to give him something to do. A lot of… Read more »
Stephanie
Guest
Stephanie

How do I bring cats into the home without my dogs killing them? I was told to use the remote collar but I don’t want the dogs to be scared to go around the cats I just don’t want them to kill them.

Rocker
Guest
Rocker
Sometimes you just can’t have cats with certain dogs. (I’ve had dogs who play, eat and sleep with my cats and dogs who will never be able to live with a cat.) It depends on the individual dog. Dogs learn predatory behavior before 4-5 months of age and so raising a pup with cats then should have no issue. If your dog is a rescue, the shelter should have performed behavioral checks that would tell you if it is/may be ok with cats. If your dog is older than 5 months, it depends on its temperament. A local shelter or… Read more »
Venessa M.
Guest
Venessa M.

I have a 1 year old Siberian Husky. We have a chain link fence, but he just jumps right over. Is this PetSafe Yard & Park Remote Dog Trainer something that will train him to stay in the yard, or is it strictly a hand held remote? I really can not afford a privacy fence or an invisible fence. Is a shock collar an option?

Rotti
Guest
Rotti

This is strictly a hand held remote. I recommend the PetSafe Invisible Fence system. Not sure on the pricing now, I don’t see it being much more than this if you buy used on amazon or something. I have used it on my 5 dogs and it works extremely well and has taught them to stay in the yard.

Charlie
Guest
Charlie

Breeds like huskies are so stubborn they will run through the fence. What’s a little shock if they get to go and have fun? The solution is to chain them when they’re outside or buy a bigger fence.

Vince
Guest
Vince
Same issue with my husky when she was younger. One question I would like to propose first is if your dog is spayed or neutered? From an already stubborn breed who wants to run free, this will make the issues worse. The good news is you already have a designated area where he or she can run free. Pet safe yards would be best as this is most likely an issue that would persist even if you were not at the house. Some dogs just really want to get out and need to understand that you are in charge and… Read more »
Amanda M
Guest
Amanda M

I have a one year old Chi-Pin mix. He weighs 8 lbs. Do you know of any shock collars for dogs that small? I can’t seem to find any online.

Libertybells
Guest
Libertybells
I have a big Mastiff who is 6 years old, however she is extremely impulsive, everything is a knee jerk reaction with her. My biggest issue with her is that I have to put her in the crate before I open my door otherwise she will knock me over and bolt through the door and chase cars. I live in a pretty rural area that is isolated and yet she still manages to cause traffic jams. It’s pure havoc when she gets loose and can take me up to three hours to catch her. I am terrified she will cause… Read more »
Kimberly Alt
Guest
Kimberly Alt
Every dog reacts differently to a shock collar. For some dogs, it helps immediately while others it doesn’t seem to phase them. Unfortunately, you won’t find this out until you try it out on your mastiff. If a trainer is something you’re interested in and can afford your dog could benefit greatly from the 1 on 1 attention. We recommend a trainer over a shock collar in this instance. Not only would she get human interaction and play time, but she’d also learn how to listen to commands and follow your lead. Remember that habits are not created over night,… Read more »
Libertybells
Guest
Libertybells
I actually found a trainer last summer, took her to him one Saturday afternoon. He had me bring her out in the parking lot, then he told me to unleash her. This was right in town where there were lots of cars driving by. Since she was already barking and lunging at passing cars, I knew what would happen so I told him that it would not be wise for me to do that. His response was that I will be surprised. I did not believe him so her and I left. I could not find another trainer since then… Read more »
Vince
Guest
Vince
An alternate way to training your dog into not chasing cars is by altering behavior. This is what is implemented usually for avoiding snakes, fireworks, and other undesired behaviors like chasing cars. When your dog sees a car, have him do something. What I would do is every time a car passes, have your dog lay down or sit. This eventually teaches them that instead of chasing the car, to sit and wait for you. Alternatively, what they do for snake training or fireworks, is to distract them-so give them a treat when fireworks are going off so instead of… Read more »
Kimberly Alt
Guest
Kimberly Alt

Trainers have different methods so it’s important to find one that fits your needs. It sounds like this trainer had a method that didn’t match what you were looking for. I don’t blame you for feeling this way. I wouldn’t want to unleash my dog near traffic either.

Since it’s been a year since you’ve searched it may not hurt to look again for a trainer. Try asking your vet for suggestions too.

shirley tidball
Guest
shirley tidball

My springer spaniel just killed my chicken will a shock collar train him?

Vince
Guest
Vince
It may help a little bit but keep in mind you have a dog bred for hunting. You cannot un-train instinct, but you can minimize it. Socializing the pup from a young age with chickens would be ideal but if the pup is too old maybe try socializing a different way. Definitely avoid any chicken chew toys or chicken food as the smell alone will drive him. And maybe have him near chickens through a fence or some barrier and just in little increments daily. It would be a long and tedious process but having the shock collar would help.… Read more »
Sarah Hood
Guest
Sarah Hood
I have a pit/jack russel rescue. Scout is wonderful. Has a little bit of separation anxiety, yet is great with kids and other dogs, except when a toy is involved. He loves to play with other dogs, yet I am anxious to go to the dog park anymore because of this behavior. He will turn in a matter of seconds on a dog that he was just playing with, if someone throws a ball and they both go for it. He does not do this with people, food or anything else. Just toys with other dogs. He does not get… Read more »
Vince
Guest
Vince

No the collar for this specific situation because the dog may associate the shock as another dog and cause a worse issue. However, toy aggression is extremely common among dogs. Unfortunately the dog park is not meant for everyone, but there are daycare facilities that will have toy-less parks that can help.

Rocker
Guest
Rocker
I personally don’t believe a shock collar would work in this case. I used shock collars for various training issues and have owned many pits and jack russels over the years and I can’t imagine the combination’s temperament with toys, as my russels alone are hard headed about their toys but their small size keeps them from doing too much damage if they attack. I know with my current jack, I cannot bring him to dog parks unless there is an available separate space he can run. (Some parks have separate fenced areas). I don’t think a shock collar would… Read more »
Chemsem
Guest
Chemsem
Hello everyone. I am in dire help. Let me explain the situation: my wife fell in love with an American adult female akita at a dog adoption fair. We tried and failed to adopt it. We were beaten by another individual. My wife really had her heart set on one. After much research on the breed (we are not first time dog owners just first time Akita owners) we purchased a pair of siblings. Six years later: the female acts aloof, hard headed playful like a typical Akita. The boy became seriously dog aggressive even though we socialized him at… Read more »
Vince
Guest
Vince
From what I gathered in your reading is that your dogs are not fixed. It is not an issue but it will cause the both of them to fight when she is in heat almost every time as a natural way of avoiding inbreeding. It is a little more detailed than that, but just look at it from that perspective. I wouldn’t say the boy is dog aggressive but keep in min that Akita’s are dominant type breeds and won’t back down from a fight. A good way to mitigate this issue is to identify an alpha. It is expected… Read more »
Libertybells
Guest
Libertybells

Hi, just wondering, have you had yours dog’s blood checked for Hypothyroid Disease? I know it affects roughly 70% of Akitas and it is known to cause aggression and other behavioral problems. If you haven’t had them checked for that, I would request a blood test from your vet because it can easily be treated with hormone therapy.

Chemsem
Guest
Chemsem

No I haven’t. I was not aware. I’ll ask my vet. I’m trying a shock collar at vibration and lowest setting but it doesn’t seem to get across to him. I don’t want to scar him but I don’t want him to be given away and have someone destroy him when they realize how much work he is.

Libertybells
Guest
Libertybells
Years ago I had a Akita who was showing some worrying signs of aggression, took him to a trainer and the trainer actually told me that he cannot be fixed of the problem and I should have him put down. He actually told me that by keeping my dog I was “playing Russian Roulette” I refused to take the trainer’s advice and did a lot of research, I discovered that hypothyroidism is extremely common in Akitas and is known to cause aggression in dogs, I had him checked and treated for it and as a result he became the most… Read more »
Kimberly Alt
Guest
Kimberly Alt

I’m so sorry you are in this situation. Do you have enough room in your yard for them to be outside dogs?

Chemsem
Guest
Chemsem
It kind of saddens me to think that they have been inside dogs for six years sleeping on the couch sometimes next to me while I nap and then to leave them outside all day while I’m at home with the baby. My wife had already given me an ultimatum: either the male dog gets a shock collar or we get rid of them. To think she originally wanted the breed but I’ve been the one who raised them. They have both matured: calmer they don’t destroy the couch etc. but the male still panics when left outside for too… Read more »
bestpets
Guest
bestpets

Please be aware that the use of shock on dogs can increase aggressive behavior. Your son could be in even more danger than he is now, as your dog can learn to associate the feeling of shock as coming from your son, and work to preempt it by aggression directed at your son. The behaviors you describe with multiple dogs with a history of aggression are quite dangerous for children in the home, or visiting children. I love dogs. If this was my kid and my dogs, the dogs would be gone.

Tahoe Gal
Guest
Tahoe Gal

Just wondering – are they spayed and neutered? Have you consulted with your vet regarding these issues and perhaps your vet can suggest some ideas or health tests. Many times there could be an underlying health issue like low thyroid. Just some thoughts.

Chemsem
Guest
Chemsem

Thank you. My vet has prescribed Prozac but that’s about it.

Tahoe Gal
Guest
Tahoe Gal
I agree with a full blood panel test to see if any health issues such as low thyroid that Libertybells mentioned. I had a male dog on Prozac for 1 year. It helped but many vets said using Prozac on dogs should be done in conjunction with behavioral obedience training. Many other vets did not like the use of mind altering drugs for animals. Prescribing Prozac in theory should be for 1 year as the unwanted behaviors are corrected. Dogs will develop tolerance and should be evaluated periodically to make sure the right amount is adjusted per dog. Just my… Read more »
Lucy
Guest
Lucy
I have a 4 year old jack russell terrier, likes to hunt, but she is very aggressive with my sister’s dog and my little brother/sister, and she almost killed my sister’s dog (blue heeler-5 yrs old). It’s a habit forming, when she was little, I will play aggressive with her to teach her how to hunt/kill rabbits, and I thought it was okay because she was a hunter but now I’m 18 and I started to realize it’s getting so bad and I don’t know what to do, and my dad wants me to put her down in case it… Read more »
Kimberly Alt
Guest
Kimberly Alt
Have you tried going to another place for training classes? It sounds like the business didn’t turn your away as must as they may not be accepting new dogs. Our first suggestion is to get her into training classes. We feel this is the best route for her. However, if that is not possible you can try a shock collar. We have one linked in the article, which we consider to be among the best. Be sure to read instructions carefully and use the shock collar properly for optimum results. Best of luck and let us know if you need… Read more »
Mamaw Rain
Guest
Mamaw Rain
I have a 20 month old, shelter dog, beagle/jack russell terrier mix, she adopted me 1 month, 2 wks and 1 day ago, she may insist I take her back tomorrow. 🙁 Olivia has obviously been abused. She is timid and has separation anxiety. I ‘used to* go to church 4 times a week. Not anymore. Olivia’s barking, howling and crying disturb my neighbors, a lot. She destroyed the linoleum in the bathroom and a 3ft x 1ft piece of carpet in bedroom doorway when I left her. I have worked and worked with her. Thundershirt, anti anxiety pills (all… Read more »
Lalala
Guest
Lalala

One month is not a long time for a dog to be in a new home. She is probably still incredibly stressed every day, regardless of if you are there or not. It takes dogs 6 months to get fully settled in a new place.

Mamaw Rain
Guest
Mamaw Rain

Thanks for the reply. She is now in a much better home for her. A house, a yard, someone always home. 🙂

Amanda Smith
Guest
Amanda Smith
I have a two year old pit mix who is the sweetest dog ever…till he meets strangers. He barks, growls and nips at people he doesn’t know. I love having friends over but I can’t without feeling uneasy with my dog. It’s so stressful to spend hours trying to get him adjusted to new people and it sometimes doesn’t work. When it does work he will be your best friend! Does anyone think a shock collar would work? Professional training for this type of behavior is really expensive where I’m at so I’m trying to make that my last resort.… Read more »
N
Guest
I disagree. I believe that a shock collar could be useful in this case WITH PROPER TRAINING. I am a future vet neurologist/behaviorist starting school. I enjoy familiarizing myself with different behavior modifications but am by NO MEANS AN EXPERT. DONT OVERUSE IT. I am trying a shock collar for an advanced aggression case, much worse than yours, as your dog is generally friendly. My 13 lb lhasapoo will snap at me and my family if we try getting him to do something he doesn’t want to do. I have tried everything to correct his behavior, squirt bottles and shake… Read more »
zcsnightmare
Guest
zcsnightmare
Try alternative methods that do not inflict pain or stress. A shock collar could do the opposite and trigger your dog to bite and attack. I train dogs to underground fences with shock collars. Aggressive dogs usually respond to pain and discomfort aggressively, especially for direct behavior modification instead of them learning avoidance. Positive training, via reward for proper behavior, is strongly recommended for socialization and teaching your dog to be at ease with strangers. Also, there are some spray & noise cans you could try. That type of behavior takes time and patience to change. If he growls, remove… Read more »
Andrea Woodard
Guest
Andrea Woodard
My pitt bull was found on the streets. I have spent hundreds of dollars and months of training at Pet Co. My dog only responds if you give him a treat. He only does commands when HE WANTS to. I am ready to give him away. Even the trainer gave up on him! We can’t even take him for a walk without him biting the leash, jumping and biting in my face, tripping me. We were told if he went to the pound he would either be put down, or die of starvation as we “saved him” and he is… Read more »
Mallika
Guest
Mallika
First – make a list of all the unwanted behavior you want to train out of him. Next, get a different trainer. Trainers who give up on dogs lack patience. Third, tackle each problem individually. Identify ONE extremely high value treat – it’s a good thing your dog is treat motivated. That treat is reserved for training wanted behavior in him. Good ideas are high quality dry liver and also peanut butter. Four – try a gentle leader. It might work and stop his pulling. If not, try a harness designed to prevent them from pulling – the exact name… Read more »
Barbara
Guest
Barbara

I agree. I work this way (with patience) and by my customers dogs love me, they turn to be sweet and more obedient. Instead of shock collar train your dog with clicker. I work with many aggressive dogs that clicker helped to change their behavior, fear. LOADS OF PATIENCE! Pits/mix pits are also intelligent but with strong character. So you have to be constant but NEVER aggressive towards him as eventually aggression will return, or to you or your friends.

Charlie
Guest
Charlie

Don’t use a shock collar for behavior like this. Growling is a sign your dog is uncomfortable, so shocking him for growling will mean he doesn’t growl but is still uncomfortable. He knows he can’t growl, so the next step is to bite. That’s when you end up with an aggressive dog- he will learn that when he meets strangers he gets hurt!

PMH
Guest

Unhelpful feedback. A shock collar can be very helpful when it is part of a well thought out training program – including lots of positive reinforcement for friendly behavior. She needs to review the various training videos and work out a plan. What she can’t do is just hope for a miracle. A poorly behaved dog is of no use to an owner, or to itself.

Captain Janeway
Guest
Captain Janeway

It’s not unhelpful feedback; you should try every single other alternative before trying a shock collar, and if you are forced to use a shock collar, you should maybe consider not owning this particular dog & passing them off to a trainer who might be able to train them without using such harmful devices.

Kimberly Alt
Guest
Kimberly Alt

A shock collar may help nip this bad behavior in the bud. Be sure to read the instructions for the collar you choose carefully and let us know if you have any questions. We’d be happy to help!

R A C H E L
Guest
R A C H E L

Hi I have a 11 month old staffy who jumps, barks and goes crazy when he sees other dogs on walks. We are unable to let him off his lead because if he sees another dog he will go chase after them. He isn’t aggressive, just playful and full of beans. We were going to go down the trainer route, but looking into these collars seems like it might be the better idea. Has anyone else had issues like this? Thanks

Charlie
Guest
Charlie

Shock collars in this case can lead to aggression. Staffies in particular are prone to dog aggression (I have had them for years, I’m not some hater) and shock collars can lead to them associating other dogs with pain and therefore becoming aggressive if approached by another dog.

vanna sixx
Guest
vanna sixx

My mom just got a shock collar for our 8 month old pit rot mix and he is absolutely terrified of my step mom cuz she’s the only one that uses it. I think it’s unfair to him that he has to fear her when he’s part of the family. It’s cruel and inhumane… idk sure he gets hyper and nips when he’s playing but he’s a good dog and just puppy, maybe it’s just me.

Rebecca Tweedy
Guest
Rebecca Tweedy
I need help! So my Theia peia has been attacked a few times at the dog park. And since then she has had some aggression issues with our other dogs. We have thought about doing training, but it honestly doesn’t happen very often. My issue is she is part pit and unfortunately, they are known to have lock jaw, which she does. She’s gotten my other dogs twice. We’ve been considering a shock collar, do you have any advice for us? It’s hard to tell when it’ll happen, because there’s no warning. They just get in her face (where she’s… Read more »
Vince
Guest
Vince

There’s always a warning. Learn to read your dog’s body language. As for the lock jaw, myth versus reality won you over on that one. You have a dog bred for determination.

April
Guest
April

It’s a myth that pits have lock jaw. It’s that they are so determined that they seem to have lock jaw. Research.

I suggest you train your other dogs to stay out of her face. Or try the collar that sprays the nasty smell.

David I. Waxman
Guest
David I. Waxman
I have a six month old mixed Malinois. I got her b/c I wanted a dog to run with me. When I take her out for walks, play, or trots, she always starts getting aggressive at some point. By aggressive, I mean that she growls and nips at my shoes and ankles. I do restrain her by stepping on her leash close to her head and/or grabbing her by the back of the neck until she settles down. She does settle down, but not before she snarls and snaps at me with vigor. The above techniques have been implemented with… Read more »
Charlie
Guest
Charlie

You need a new trainer. This is puppy behavior, not aggression. She is excited and wants to play. By “restraining” her you’re making her frustrated, and more worked up.

Kimberly Alt
Guest
Kimberly Alt

Have you spoken to your professional trainer about a shock collar or other ways to stop this behavior?

Hana
Guest
Hana
My husband and I got a pitbull puppy mixed with a lab (we think) and got her from one of my local vets who found her on the streets and took her in for 2 months. We then got her today. The vet says she is not a barker and was a bit timid in meeting me. I took her to the pet store to pick out a collar and she saw another puppy and started barking and growling (which sounded super aggressive) but she was just excited. We got her a shock collar and it seemed to work for… Read more »
Kimberly Alt
Guest
Kimberly Alt

Hi Hana, how is she doing now that it’s been a few days?

Christa
Guest
Christa

We have an adorable lab/brittany spaniel mix. We don’t have a fence and live in a neighborhood relatively close to a major highway. He turns 2 years old next month. We are considering the shock collar to keep him in our yard. He is almost 90 pounds. He is a sweet dog, but if we ever let him off the leash, he will run all over the neighborhood, and we have to go get him. I’m concerned if a shock collar will stop him, if he tries to bolt?

Kimberly Alt
Guest
Kimberly Alt

A shock collar can work but know there is some learning that comes along with it. Having the setting correct is important so you are able to keep him safe. If possible I would put up a fence. I know it takes more work, but a fence is more of a “sure thing” than a shock collar and it will help show him physical boundaries.

Elise C
Guest
Elise C
Hi, We have 3 dachshunds. Two boys and one girl. We had them all together for about 2-3 years before the two boys got in a fight. They are both fixed. The youngest boy was a rescue, very malnourished when we got him and was and still is very anxious/hyper. I accidentally closed the front door (lightly and not completely) on my older boys tail and it just so happened that at the same time the young boy hopped over to us. I think Hank, the older one/about 7yrs old, thought Charlie, the younger /about 4yrs old, attacked him when… Read more »
Kimberly Alt
Guest
Kimberly Alt
Wow, that’s a tough situation. I’m so sorry this is happening. My initial thoughts are that Charlie is the only one that needs a shock collar. If Hank has “let it go” then he isn’t as much of a threat as Charlie is. However, I can understand why you’d get a collar for both of them. You could start with one collar on Charlie and when he begins to get aggressive give him a little shock. If you know the signs leading up to Charlie biting Hank you can shock him ahead of time so he begins to connect the… Read more »
Elise C
Guest
Elise C

Ok, that’s what we were thinking. Thanks for the quick response and your advice!

Karin Daiute Johnson
Guest
Karin Daiute Johnson

I just brought in a new 6 month old puppy appears to be rottweiler and pitbull mix. We currently have 4 dogs two males and two females and he has been very aggressive towards my two females oddly enough my opinion. How do I break him of being aggressive the other dogs in the house. This is my first time bringing in a six-month-old. I’ve always brought them in younger his temperament is sweet and kind and wants to be loved but he’s showing aggression towards the two females right now.

Jackie Maurer
Guest
Jackie Maurer
3 months ago, we adopted a 3 year old mixed breed, shepard/boxer/pointer. He was not neutered at the age of 2 when first brought to the pound and was severely underweight, so I’m pretty sure he was on his own for some time. He had also been in and out of the pound several times in the year before we got him. He is really smart and positive reinforcement works pretty well for many things. However, he has come to understand that ‘NO’ means ‘Stop what I’m doing and then I get a treat.’ His logic is now ‘do bad… Read more »
Violet
Guest
Violet
We have two 9 month great Danes, brother and sister. Neither are food aggressive and respect each other’s food bowls. But if there is any sort of unclaimed food on the floor (at any time or place) the male will attack any other dog near him. He will run over to the other dog even if it is nowhere near the food. He has been doing this since he was a pup too, and we are worried he will seriously hurt another dog. It isn’t necessarily a bad attitude either, he is the sweetest boy and then he just snaps.… Read more »
Erin
Guest
Erin
I have a 9 month old Lab/Chow mix who I have been having multiple problems with. I know part of it is I’ve been moving around a lot (about every 4 months) since my husband is currently deployed and I’m traveling for work. I expected her to act out some but I’m at my wits end with some of her behaviors. She seems to out right ignore me and just do what she wants. We completed the 6 week Positive puppy training class from petco and she has gotten better with some of her cues/commands (like sit mostly) but here… Read more »
wendy
Guest
wendy
I bought an e-collar for my 11 month old goldie/cocker mix. She was picking up bad things on walks, ciggie buts, bottle caps, chewing gum, bark chips, on and on. I knew it would only be a matter of time before she would need surgery to remove an obstruction or perhaps even puncture her intestine with a piece of sharp plastic. She is very stubborn about dropping things, and if she picks up anything in the yard (sprinkler head) then she’s off to the races. This is my first day with it. I am only using the beep feature right… Read more »
Lmsage731
Guest
Lmsage731

I have an 11 month old Great Dane. She is an absolute sweetheart with animals and people. I take her to the dog park regularly. The problem is she jumps, barks and growls when dogs walk by. She is almost jumping over my fence. This also happens while I am walking her. She is scaring people because of her size and I am afraid she is going to jump over the fence. I have tried training classes and positive reinforcement training. Shock collars are the next step I was contemplating. Is there another?

Jason C
Guest
Jason C
We adopted a pit bull puppy a few months ago (he is 5 months old now). He is really sweet and has been wonderful. The only thing we can’t get right is the nipping at our six year old. He sees him as a playmate and grabs his shirt, pants, and will often bite at hands, feet, legs, etc. Not hard at all but I’m worried it will get harder. I understand the positive reinforcement concept and it has worked really well for many things (I can count on one hand how many times he went the bathroom in the… Read more »
Josh Hampton
Guest
Josh Hampton

At 5 months he is still learning what he can and can’t chew. I don’t even see a problem here.

Melissa Nichols
Guest
Melissa Nichols

Seek the help of a professional positive reinforcement trainer. It’s well worth the investment and won’t break the bond and trust of your puppy.

Shanista
Guest
Shanista

Jason we also adopted a pit bull puppy, she’s now 5 months old. We’re having the exact problem with her. She however is also jumping on people and it seems no matter what we do she isn’t listening. I’ve always thought shock collars were harmful but after speaking to my cousin who’s a trainer I feel ok about it. It doesn’t need to be long term either, but because pit bulls are so intelligent and also stubborn you’ll need to gauge how long he needs it.

Vince
Guest
Vince
A big part of the solution is to understand the temperament of your breed. Pitty’s are very intelligent and stubborn at times. Also, in the puppy stage, training should be done very young. A dog learns bite inhibition with its brothers and sisters and needs to be socialized from 8-12 weeks when it is essential. If the dog is 5 months and still nipping at people or clothes, try changing it up and associating an undesired setting- such as a kennel or outside. Give him a “no” then if he does not respond a simple “too bad” or a word… Read more »
Mel
Guest

My ridgeback did the same thing. I spanked him with a rolled up newspaper, and said “NO!” After so many warnings, I would catch him about to nip clothing. I would say no, and when he listened, he got a treat.

Amber
Guest
Amber
I have a wolf pup and he nips a lot. What I do, is let him bite my hand but when he gets too hard with his bite, I softly say no or yell ow, so he knows his pressure limit. Sometimes it’s hard to train defensive, or predator dogs to not bite because it’s honestly in every dogs nature to use their nose and mouth to learn. I suggest try nibble training. That’s what I did, and I can now leave my hand in my wolf’s mouth and he just naws on it softly with barely any pressure. I… Read more »
Mir
Guest

So the dog will go and nip at clothes when you’re around, because it’s followed by a no and a treat. I understand positive reinforcement when it comes to teaching a dog new things but to stop them doing unwanted things it doesn’t help to tell them no and then give them a treat. That just means every time they do something bad they get a no and a treat, so it’s worth it for them to bite, bark, or do whatever that causes you to give him a treat.

Lee Terrell
Guest
Lee Terrell

The key is to say “no” before so the pup recognizes the action being wrong and then
apply the punishment. Better than a newspaper though is a thing called the “Bonker” which is a tightly rolled up towel cut in half and bound with rubber bands. It doesn’t have the sharp edges that a newspaper does and allows you to hit the dog in the face without harming them. Additionally it can be thrown as well.

Cathy Strunk Mayne
Guest
Cathy Strunk Mayne

Did you see your dog exhibit any fear or aggression toward you because of using a rolled up newspaper?

Vanessa Gliha
Guest
Vanessa Gliha
If the pup nips at anything be shouldn’t, then a negative reinforcement – a withdrawal from activity – will work the best. Since he is so intelligent, it will not take long to learn that skin and clothing is a ‘no go’ zone. First, make sure that there is only 1 designated tug toy for a few weeks. He only gets to play tug with that toy and nothing else until he learns not to pull at clothing. Keep a leash on him that he can’t chew through (tie out chords are great for that). Whenever you see him biting… Read more »
PMH
Guest

That might work, but it requires you to monitor the dog every moment of the day. Also, it is not negative reinforcement it is punishment. Effective punishment has to be 100%, be truly aversive to your pet, and be immediate. Remember that 15 minutes is eternity for a dog. Mine have an attention span of under ten seconds. After two minutes, never mind 15 they have no idea why they are tied up. They certainly are not there reconsidering their bad behavior. Briefer punishment is better because it is immediate consequences that influence behavior – so says the theory.

Cathy Strunk Mayne
Guest
Cathy Strunk Mayne

After tethering your dog with a leash for time out did you see him develop negative behavior toward walking on his leash?

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