Kiss Kibble Goodbye: Homemade Dog Food Recipes

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Person cooking hot dog food in pan Imagine if you had to eat the same food every meal, every day of your life. Beyond being painfully dull, wouldn’t you question whether you’re getting a nutritionally balanced diet? Welcome to a dog’s life.

Long ago before commercially produced dog food, dogs ate a lot of the same foods as humans. There’s a reason our dogs beg for our food — they’re meant to eat a variety. Table scraps anyone?

We’ve cooked up some tips on how to make dog food, nutrition guidelines and our favorite homemade dog food recipes. We guarantee your pup will benefit from your efforts and could even improve behavioral problems that stem from dietary deficiencies.

Article Overview

What Are The Benefits Of Homemade Dog Food?

Homemade dog food can benefit your canine companion in a number of ways — especially if you have a pet who suffers from allergies, gastrointestinal sensitivity or skin problems.

Highly-processed foods also tend to lose nutritional value, whereas making dog food from scratch maintains more of the vital nutrients during the cooking process. With fresh food, you know exactly what your dog is getting versus reading the label and being confused by all the included additives and preservatives.

It’s also a good idea to have these recipes handy in case you happen to run out of dog food. Treat your dog as you would any of your other family members by preparing nutritious food from trusted ingredients.

What Nutrition Guidelines Should You Follow?

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Just like humans, every dog is different, so this is not meant to be a one-pup-fits-all rule. Serving size, your pup’s weight, health conditions, size and activity level are all factors you should take into consideration when determining what’s right for your dog.

However, in general, there are six basic nutrients required for dogs to maintain a healthy, balanced diet: water, protein, fat, carbohydrates, minerals and vitamins. A mix of these nutrients provides energy for your dog’s body to metabolize and grow.

Here are the benefits of the necessary nutrients and why it’s important your pup has adequate amounts of each (listed in order of priority).

  • Protein (chicken, lamb, turkey, beef, fish and cooked eggs) – Helps with growth and maintenance of cells, tissues, organs, antibodies, hormones and enzymes.
  • Fat (from oil and meat) – Assists with the absorption of certain vitamins (see below), protects and insulates internal organs and promotes good skin and hair growth.
  • Carbohydrates (rice, corn and beans) – Keeps intestines healthy and supplies glucose to critical organs, including the brain.
  • Minerals, including calcium, potassium, sodium, magnesium, iron, zinc, etc. – Gives dogs structurally sound bones and teeth, among other benefits.
  • Vitamins A, B, C, D, E and K – Promotes weight loss, eye and skin health, immunity and more.

Water accounts for 60-70% of dog’s body weight so it’s critical they stay hydrated in addition to eating a well-balanced diet. Dehydration can lead to a number of health issues so ensure they are drinking enough water throughout the day, too.

Before embarking on a homemade meal plan, consult with your veterinarian to make sure your dog’s diet sufficiently meets all its nutritional needs.

Low-Calorie Dog Food Recipes

A note about calories: all the recipes listed below are better for your dogs than canned dog food or kibble because they are made from natural ingredients with no additives or preservatives. That being said, they are relatively lower in calories as a result but should be consumed in moderation (serving sides similar to what they currently eat).

Homemade Dog Food Delivered

In the age of UberEats, DoorDash and having just about everything you can think of delivered, we are lucky enough to have the option to purchase fresh, natural dog food that can be shipped to our doorsteps. It can be a huge time-saver and may be worth the cost after you add up the prices of all the ingredients you’ll need to cook a recipe.

Pet Plate ships frozen so you can keep it for when you want to treat your pup or serve it every day as a part of regular meal time. No dog will complain about these tasty meals made with fresh and easy to pronounce human-grade ingredients. And you can spend your time on more important things, like belly rubs and walks!

Our Favorite Homemade Dog Food Recipes

We’ve written up some of our favorite dog food recipes to share with you. To jump to a recipe you’re interested in, click on the link below. We also have some yummy organic dog treat recipes and treats made with Thanksgiving leftovers.

Note: Serving size is not included because portion sizes vary depending on a number of factors, including breed, weight, activity level, age, and health of your dog. A common recommendation is to feed your dog a comparable amount of ounces/cups to what you would usually feed in kibble BUT check with your vet to be certain.

Beef Stew, Doggie Style | Turkey, Rice and Veggie Mix | Easy Crockpot Beef & Rice Meal | Pumpkin Dog Biscuits | Grain-Free Chicken Jerky Strips | Frozen Banana Treats

Beef Stew, Doggie Style

Diced carrots

A much healthier alternative to canned dog food, this recipe is loaded with iron from fresh protein and vitamins and can be stored in your fridge for most of the week (or frozen and heated up later).

Ingredients

  • 1 pound of beef stew meat
  • 1 small sweet potato
  • 1/2 cup of carrots, diced
  • 1/2 cup of green beans, diced
  • 1/2 cup of flour
  • 1/2 cup of water
  • 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil

Total: Makes approx. 4 cups (or 32 fluid ounces)

Nutritional Info (per 1 cup serving):

  • Calories: 301
  • Protein: 36.7 g
  • Fat: 8.4 g
  • Carbs: 17.4 g
  • Minerals & Vitamins: Vitamin D, Calcium, Iron, Potassium

Directions

  1. Cook the sweet potato in a microwave for 5 to 8 minutes until firm but tender. Set aside.
  2. Slice the beef into small chunks, about the size of a nickel.
  3. Cook the beef stew pieces in a tablespoon of vegetable oil over medium heat for 10-15 minutes or until well-done.
  4. Remove the beef chunks from the pan, reserving the drippings.
  5. Dice the sweet potato.
  6. Heat the drippings over medium-low heat. Slowly add flour and water into the drippings while whisking to create a thick gravy.
  7. Add the meat, sweet potato, carrots and green beans into the gravy and stir to coat.
  8. Cook until the carrots are tender — about 10 minutes.
  9. Let it cool and serve.
  10. Store remaining stew in the fridge for up to 5 days.

Recipe from: Money Crashers

Turkey, Rice And Veggie Mix

Brown rice in jar

This is an excellent, low-calorie and low-fat recipe for pooches who may need to keep the pounds off. With a good balance of lean animal protein, healthy carbs and veggies, it yields 12 cups of dog food and can be refrigerated for up to 5 days.

Ingredients

  • 6 cups water
  • 1 pound ground turkey
  • 2 cups uncooked brown rice
  • 1 teaspoon dried rosemary
  • 1/2 (16 ounces) package frozen broccoli, carrots and cauliflower

Total: Makes approx. 12 cups (or 96 fluid ounces)

Nutritional Info (per 1 cup serving):

  • Calories: 97
  • Protein: 11 g
  • Fat: 4.3 g
  • Carbs: 4.7 g
  • Minerals & Vitamins: Iron, Potassium

Directions

  1. Place the water, ground turkey, rice and rosemary into a large Dutch oven.
  2. Stir until the ground turkey is broken up and evenly distributed throughout the mixture.
  3. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce heat to low.
  4. Simmer for 20 minutes.
  5. Add the frozen vegetables and cook for an additional 5 minutes.
  6. Remove from heat and cool.
  7. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Recipe from: Allrecipes

Easy Crockpot Beef & Rice Meal

Kidney beans

We love this recipe for its nutritional value, its quick prep time (10 minutes) and the easy crockpot cooking. It yields 12, cups and, like the beef stew, can be frozen for future feedings.

Ingredients

  • 2 ½ pounds ground beef
  • 1 ½ cups uncooked brown rice
  • 1 (15-ounce) can kidney beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 ½ cups chopped butternut squash
  • 1 ½ cups diced carrots
  • ½ cup frozen peas
  • 4 cups of water

Total: Makes approx. 12 cups (or 88 fluid ounces)

Nutritional Info (per 1 cup serving):

  • Calories: 400
  • Protein: 39.1g
  • Fat: 7g
  • Carbs: 44.2 g
  • Minerals & Vitamins: Iron, Potassium, Calcium

Directions

  1. Stir in all ingredients with 4 cups of water in a crockpot.
  2. Cover and cook on low heat for 5 to 6 hours or high heat for 2 to 3 hours.
  3. Stir as needed and cool to room temperature.

Recipe from: Damn Delicious

Pumpkin Dog Biscuits

Textured pumpkin puree

Are you looking for a doggie digestive aid? Pumpkin is easy on sour stomachs and can help alleviate your dog’s digestive issues. These homemade dog biscuits are a great way to introduce an all-natural tummy aid into your pup’s diet.

Ingredients

  • 1 can pumpkin puree
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup oats (optional if your dog is on a grain free diet, sub an extra 1/4 cup grain free flour)
  • 3 cups whole wheat flour, brown rice flour or gluten-free flour
  • 3 tablespoons of peanut butter (make sure it’s xylitol free)
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon (optional)

Total: Makes approx. 24 treats

Nutritional Info (per 1 biscuit serving):

  • Calories: 27
  • Protein: 1.3 g
  • Fat: 1.5g
  • Carbs: 2.8 g
  • Minerals & Vitamins: Vitamin D, Iron

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. In small bowl, stir together the flour, oats and cinnamon.
  3. In a separate large bowl, whisk together the eggs, pumpkin and peanut butter until combined. Stir wet ingredients into dry.
  4. Pour onto a floured surface and roll dough out to 1/2″ thick. Cut out using cookie cutter.
  5. The dough will be a little sticky, add a dusting of flour to your hands and the rolling pin to help. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes until golden brown.
  6. Place on cooling racks and let cool thoroughly. They will harden as they cool.

Recipe from: My Baking Addiction

Grain-Free Dog Food Recipe: Chicken Jerky Strips

Don’t trust store-bought rawhides, which often have a ton of additives and preservatives? Homemade chicken jerky strips are a perfect replacement. This grain-free recipe is a much healthier alternative and very easy to make. Store them in an air-tight container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks (if they last that long!).

Ingredients

  • 2 to 4 boneless, 3-oz skinless chicken breasts

Total: Makes approx. 10-20 strips

Nutritional Info (per 1 stick serving):

  • Calories: 33
  • Protein: 7.8 g
  • Fat: >1g
  • Carbs: 0 g
  • Minerals & Vitamins: Vitamin D, Potassium

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 200 degrees.
  2. Trim all excess fat off the chicken breasts.
  3. Cut into 1/8 inch thick strips using a paring knife.
  4. Bake for 2 hours on a baking sheet until the strips are dry and hard.
  5. Cool completely before presenting to your pooch.

Recipe from: Top Dog Tips

Frozen Banana Treats

Creamy peanut butter

After a long walk in the hot sun, what pooch wouldn’t want a refreshing treat? We absolutely love this simple recipe – yogurt, banana and peanut butter. It’s a frozen smoothie for your dog. Need we say more?

Ingredients

  • 4 cups plain yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons peanut butter (make sure it’s xylitol free)
  • 3 ripe bananas, peeled & mashed

Total: Makes approx. 8 1-oz treats

Nutritional Info (per 1 treat serving):

  • Calories: 150
  • Protein: 8.5 g
  • Fat: 3.7 g
  • Carbs: 19.5 g
  • Minerals & Vitamins: Calcium, Potassium, Iron

Directions

  1. Blend all ingredients into a puree.
  2. Pour into 4-ounce plastic cups (ice trays or toddler popsicle trays work well).
  3. Freeze until firm.
  4. Can keep in the freezer for up to 2 weeks.

Recipe from: Dr. Marty

Best Cooking Practices

It’s important not to stray from homemade dog food recipes or substitute ingredients as you might for yourself and your family. Dogs have different nutritional needs that require cooking recipes exactly as instructed. Be sure to cook all animal products thoroughly to kill harmful bacteria and cook all grains, beans and starchy vegetables to make them easier for your pooch to digest.

When in doubt, an excellent resource is Home-Prepared Dog & Cat Diets: the Healthful Alternative by Donald R. Strombeck, DVM, Ph.D., a long-time expert in veterinary medicine. First published in 1999, the book is considered by many pet nutritionists to be the Bible of healthy homemade pet nutrition.

For even more cooking options, be sure to check out Home Cooking for Your Dog: 75 Holistic Recipes for a Healthier Dog.

We strongly emphasize first discussing your dog’s specific nutritional needs with your vet as every pup is different. And remember that switching your dog’s food to homemade from kibble is a slow process so patience is key.

What About BARF?

No, we’re not implying your new canine culinary skills will cause your pet to throw up. We’re referring to the raw diet fad, more affectionately known as “BARF” (which stands for Biologically Appropriate Raw Food). BARF has gained a lot of popularity among dog owners over the last few years. The basic idea is to feed your dog raw meats, grains and veggies just as his canine ancestors ate millions of years ago.

Learn more about the benefits and risks and get a raw dog food recipe to try at home in our raw dog food diets article.

Cooking For Canines: Online Help

There’s no shortage of homemade dog food recipes you can find online. We stumbled upon this fun and informative video series that gives you weekly recipe tutorials, tips and more. Check it out in case you want to subscribe through YouTube.

Most of all, have fun with your new status as your pup’s chef. We hope we’ve given you some good places to start and tasty recipes for your pooch to appreciate. Even if you’re not a master in the kitchen, homemade dog food sure beats every day of kibble!

What Foods Should Your Dog Never Eat?

As a dog owner, you’ve likely come across this essential list before, but it’s always good to have it on hand as a reminder, especially if you’re cooking dog food from scratch. The principal toxic foods include:

  • Chocolate
  • Onions and garlic
  • Avocados
  • Grapes and raisins
  • Macadamia nuts
  • Raw bread dough
  • Alcohol

For a more extensive list, check out this article.

Tired Of Cooking?

If all that sounds like a lot of work but you want your pup to experience homemade food with the convenience of having it delivered to your doorstep, give Pet Plate a shot. With PetPlate, you can have natural, fresh dog food sent right to your house (we’re big fans and customers ourselves)!

While DIY dog food recipes can be fun to make and a healthy alternative to consuming canned food or kibble, they may still lack all the essential minerals and vitamins needed. So in addition to PetPlate, we encourage you to check out these other dog food delivery options that are specially formulated by dog nutritionists and shipped directly to you for your pup to enjoy.

Do you have any homemade dog food recipes to recommend?

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Disclaimer: The information provided through this website should not be used for diagnosing or treating a health problem or a disease. It is not a substitute for professional care. If you have or suspect you may have a health problem, you should consult your health care provider.

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Sally holds a BA in English from James Madison University and began her 25-year writing career as a grad student at the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Journalism & Mass Communications. She’s been a pet parent since college years (and spent her whole childhood with pets).

Now as a parent of two teenagers, she’s made sure to raise her daughters to learn how to love and care for pets (and other animals) in the most responsible and loving ways. As a result, she and her daughters now have 5 rescued dogs and cats who essentially rule their home! Sally has also volunteered over the years to help raise funds for various animal nonprofit organizations.

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Bear
Would you say this safe to feed on a daily basis for the rest of my dogs life? Will this recipe provide enough Zinc for my dog? What about Vitamin E and Vitamin D etc?
Kimberly Alt (Admin)
We suggest speaking with your vet about your dog’s diet needs to make sure your dog is getting the nutrition he/she needs.
Jody
Hi Gail, I have the same question as Georgia posted on June 6th 2019. How can a person be sure your dog is getting the proper vitamin/minerals/nutrients needed for their health?
Julie
I have always cooked for my dogs but, they also get a premium kibble with their home cooked foods. This way, I know they get the nutrition they needs. I supplement with fresh fruits and veggies everyday as well. They’re all extremely healthy with zero issues. Dogs should still have some kibble, it is nutritionally complete, good for their teeth. For my senior, I soften his. I wouldn’t and, have never relied on my homemade foods as a sole source of their nutrition. Just slow cook whatever they can eat, they’ll love you for it 🙂
Cherie Unsworth
One of my dogs can’t have chicken, beef, lamb or turkey but you have no recipes for fish.
hary
is it likes fish should be ok as a protien just change it for the burger in the recipes can check with a vet to be safe frist . watch for bones though
McShane
The easiest way is to throw everything in a large slow cooker. 5 pounds regular ground beef, 3 pounds chopped beef liver, three cups of frozen or fresh veg and/or fruit, (carrots, peas, butternut squash, broccoli, blueberry, pumpkin etc.) 4 cups parboiled rice, 8 cups of water. 5 hours on high, longer on low and its done. A weeks worth in the fridge in what it was cooked in for an 80 lb dog. (substitute liver with any other organ, or rice with oats, quinoa, egg noodles, rice noodles).
Gail
One of my recipes is very similar to this one. I have six different recipes because they get tired of the same thing plus, they need different vitamins just like we do. What I make depends on what’s on sale but I do try to feed them fish high in omega 3’s at least twice to three times a month. I also switch out the veggies, too. It’s so much cheaper! I made two weeks worth of food for my two small dogs and the whole batch only cost 11 dollars. I found chicken liver on sale for 75 cents a carton, so I bought all they had! Such little effort to provide my dogs with food that they love and is so good for them. Why wouldn’t you do it for them?
Georgia
Hey Gail, I am really keen to get in to making my little one her own food – she is so over kibble. How do you ensure they are getting all the minerals/vitamins mentioned in this article?
RB13
I’m interested in finding homemade meals and treats for our dog who recently contracted diabetes, looking for an alternative to prescription dog food .
Thanks
garrett
WARNING- The recipe that calls for peanut butter does not mention to make sure that the peanut butter does not contain xylitol which is poisonous to pets.
Kimberly Alt (Admin)
Thanks for mentioning that, we’ll be sure to add a note about that!
Dori
I make food for my three dogs… The recipe is 1.5 cups of brown rice, 1.5 cups of brown lentils cooked in the instant pot for 23 minutes with 6 cups of broth and 3 sweet potatoes and a half cup of bone meal. Then I cook and food process 8 pounds of chicken or ham. Blend both parts together and refrigerate. I vary the meat from week to week as well as the veggies.
Donna Berry
Could you please tell me where you buy bone meal?? Thank you.
Barbra
I just made the beef stew,,, wow, 1/2 cup flour to 1/2 cup of water,,, PASTE! You have lost your credibility with me!
Vanessa Esperanza
I’ve been making my own dog food for over a year now. I started when one of my pups got sick and I had to make him a bland diet of chicken and rice. They love the “human food” and I feel good knowing they are getting the healthiest diet possible. I do add the supplement Azestfor to the food to make sure they are getting all their nutrients. If you are questioning if your dog is getting enough supplements I would definitely recommend using it. 🙂
Vi E
I thought rosemary was toxic to dogs.
Kimberly Alt (Admin)
According to the ASPCA, rosemary is not toxic to dogs.
stacy
I don’t see when to add the eggshell or how much in these recipes.
Steve
I spent two decades as a companion animal nutritionist, and the recipes in this article are bunk. Lacking in major vitamins and minerals. If you’re going to make homemade pet food, cooked OR raw, you NEED organ meats and bone for complete nutrition. Period. If you don’t use organ meats, you need to try to find a balance of supplemental vitamins and minerals… and having just one of these ingredients out of balance can mean suffering or death for your pet.
Terri Haken
Do you have any recipes you could share? I’m very interested in getting away from the processed dog foods.
Emily
I was thinking the same thing when I read them. I’m no nutritionist, but it is my passion and I’ve been studying human and animal nutrition for a long time. I’m glad somebody pointed this out. Steve, do you have a specific recipe you would use? I thought mine was great, but my dog apparently had sediment build-up in his bladder on a recent ultrasound. The vet hopes it’s just dehydration but thinks it could be his homemade diet. He said the sediment could come from excessive protein (which seems strange because I was just recently thinking his diet may be too carb heavy). Any tips would be awesome!
Maryanne
My dogs sediment was caused by hard water. I use distilled water and after 3 bladder stone surgeries it has never returned. I do supplement the minerals he loses. I cook all my dogs food (I foster 9) and everyone is healthy Thank God
Sissy
Steve, would you have recipes to share or know of a good book? Thanks! Contact me at Roscoe1@comcast.net
Matt
I don’t understand these instructions, specifically this bit about guidelines at the top of the article:
Calcium – crushed or powdered eggshells; a supplement
Fatty acids – cooked egg yolks, oatmeal, plant oils and other foods

But in the recipes, you never mention any of these things. How much of these should be added to each recipe?

Helen
I am have 4 100+lb dogs I make there food and fix it fresh every meal yes it is time consuming I have one female around 120 or lbs she breaks out after eating her meals in hives and it is worse if given Benadryl she is 3 yrs old I need some help I have changed diet and when I think I have found something that works I delivered these dogs so this is an old problem . HELP
Tina
Have you tried removing an ingredient each feeding to see if maybe it’s one specific thing she is allergic too …. otherwise it could be something environmental maybe the metel or plastic in the dish she eats from maybe a plant or pollen from a nearby plant materials from rugs or carpets … Also I feed honey to my allergy pup just drizzle a couple tablespoons over food as it’s anti fungel and helped tremendously with three of my allergy babies also plain yogurt I mix it with a little natural peanut butter and purred banana freeze for a treat in ice cube trey or small cups I wish you best of luck hope you find her some relief
If nothing works the vet can do a test just be sure they understand you’ve change the diet because that’s the first thing they go to !!
Adriana Srinivasan
hi everyone, I like the recipe suggested by DeAun, but I would like to add eggs because it is healthy and the shell has calcium. How many eggs a day could I feed a 80lb dog?
Lynne
I would do 1 egg per day. I’m not a canine nutritionist just based on my own research.
Katie Dotson
If you have relatives or friends that hunt/fish, they can be a great source of cheap or even free protien. Hormone and drug free. Freeze in portions that you will later use. Buy up winter squash when in season, cook up and freeze for future use.
As mentioned by others, ground egg shells are a scource of calcium. But one can add yogurt or cottage cheese as well.
Eric
As I look through the various recipes, I am impressed. However, there is one thing that disturbs me greatly.
Microwaving food. This is a big no no. Microwaving food destroys much of its food value. Microwaved water
kills plants. There are numerous studies (available on the net) that prove this. Trust but verify – that is,
don’t totally take my word for it – look it up.

May your pet live twice as long as you think it will,

Eric

sue
Eric, I read that same thing about the microwave water so I did an experiment. I tried the microwave water on plants and they did just as good as the plants I used rain water on, so I think that’s debunked. Just an FYI. Anyway, I don’t like microwave cooking either.
Kathryn
Do you have any recipes for a high fibre dirt. Or similar? My 12.5 yr old English Bulldaog has developed what they think is IBS. Thanks.
Emily Patton
Hello! I am BRAND new to this and just want to make sure I don’t miss any nutrients my babies need!! I have 2 mini dachshunds and a foster chihuaha, are there any recipes specific for tiny babies? Also, I read something about determining how much of what goes in by their weight. Anyone know HOW to do that/what the equation for that is (Example:weight-10lbs:__×10÷__=
__ (amount of carrots/beef/etc)
Natasha Matherly
Don’t use any of these recipes. They are so terribly lacking in essential nutrients for dogs. For one they have almost no calcium.
George Patriarca
So, other than your criticism, do you have anything to add? No constructive at all.
Christine
Constructive: Dr. Pitcairn’s Natural Health for Dogs & Cats is comprehensive on supplements, recipes and nutritional requirements. It’s a hefty book and the layout is frustrating. But it is more complete than a blog post can be. I’ve used it since ~2005 for 4 dogs. Vet checks and blood work verify good health.
JoAnna Kuehl
Where can I find the book mentioned above by Donald Strombeck DMV free online??
Vijaya
My dogs are now spoilt. Once I started making home cook food for them, shop bought food does not get look in
Because my Sheeba called MICHI (delightful in Japanese) and Lady India Border Terrier. I needed to cook grain free food. Oh, do they love it but now no choice but cook.
When the plate is empty and when give you that ‘look’ -it is worth it
I make it 2 weeks food in to balls and keep half in fridge and half in fridge
I just made chicken strips in oven as you suggested – that is for walkies
Amd many thanks for giving us different varieties which I will try to make
Alex Paul
Homemade dog treats will have many benefits over the foods purchased from the market. First of all, you can decide the right amount of nutritional value you are going to feed your dog and even you can able to manage cook different kind of varieties and tastes that your dog prefer.
Robin
I need advice!
I do not know what discussion is going on, i do have some questions. I am new to all of this making your dog food and I wish i had done this from the start, but better late then never. I can only do Chicken or Turkey recipes, my male English Setter, can not eat beef, he has had 2 severe pancreatic attacks, once at 1 1/2, and then the camp ground managers stopped and gave him treats when we were gone, both times we almost lost him. That being said, with their weight, they get 1 cup of dry in the am & pm, should taht be what i feed to them with cooked or raw dog food?
How about vitamins & minerals, i cant find it now but i seen one recipe taht said you can not feed a home made diet without feeding them the vitamins, and is there specific ones that i should look for and is that placed in their food when you serve it, or when you cook it? And what is the best book to help decide raw or cooked, and recipes for both, along with the vitamins..
Vijaya
Hi Robin
Do we take vitamins and minerals daily? At least my friends and I don’t. If you have square meal you get from food. Same goes for the dog. Although now I am in UK, in rural india dog ate what we ate and they were working dogs. Lived to ripe old age.
If you get fresh ingredients proportion as suggested [vet says the same thing]
you should be ok. I don’t give my dogs beef as I don’t handle it, I use chicken, turkey fish eggs
I crush the eggshells and chicken bones in my vitamix. Good for the dogs and plants to in the garden
Good luck and relax
DeAun Kietzman
I just started making food for my 10 yr. old lab. Here goes: 2 lbs hamburger 1 lb chicken hearts and gizzards, 1/2 lb beef liver, 8 cups brown rice, large can of collard greens, small can of pumpkin, small can of peas and carrots, 1/2 cup blueberries. I chop up the liverand gizzards. Put it all in 16 cups of water and boli for 20 minutes. I vary the veggies and fruit. She weighs about 90 lbs and needs to lose weight so I feed her 2 lbs a day. I add chia seeds when feeding. 21/4 t a day. She was a picky eater before so she got way too many human food treats. Now she gobbles down her food and no more begging. Just started so I might have to adjust her serving size.
Elizabeth Langford
Hello DeAun, I love your recipe. I think it has a good balance.I use frozen peas and carrots because of the salt that’s included in can goods. I also use half brown rice and quinoa.I’m going to try it with fruit.
Thanks for the recipe.
Teresa
Is it 8 cups of uncooked brown rice? That seems like much too much