How to Pick the Best Dog Collars and Leashes For Your Dog

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Dog on leashAs much as you’d love for your pup to run wild and free like Lassie, it’s just not a smart risk to take. The key word here being risk, because no matter how well-behaved your pup is, there’s always the chance that he won’t heel when hollered for, or come when called. He could run off in play and lose his way home, or worse, dart into a busy street. That’s why a collar and a leash is a must for every pup. Before you decide, take a look at our collar and leash guide to find what combo fits you and your canine best.

The Importance of Dog Collars and Leashes

In addition to helping you keep your pup safe, collars also provide a place to hang your dog’s identification tags which contain his name and yours, a phone number and proof of rabies vaccination. In the event your dog does get loose and can’t find his or her way home, a collar with ID tags attached ensure that the sweet soul that finds your runaway canine will easily know how to get him home.

Safety aside, there’s also another big reason for collaring, and thereby leashing, your dog: training. Some collars are designed specifically as training tools, but the ones that aren’t are still a valuable tool in teaching your dog to mind his P’s and Q’s. For example, it’d be much harder to teach your pup to heel if he couldn’t begin by learning to associate the word with the action. A slight tug of the leash used in conjunction with the verbal command is a much stronger training tool than verbal commands alone.

Types of Dog Collars

Picking out the right collar for your dog may be tougher than you think. From flat collars to shock collars, we’ll give you all the info you need to pick the perfect collar for your pup.

Regular Collars

Flat Collars

Rogz Utility Collar on AmazonFlat collars are your standard, everyday dog collar. Often made from nylon or other hardy materials, flat collars generally have plastic or metal quick-release closures, and should fit comfortably on your dog’s neck: A good rule here is you should be able to fit two fingers under the collar easily. A ring is attached to the collar which is the place to attach ID tags and also your leash. Learn more about personalized dog tags.

Martingale Collars

Guardian Gear Martingale Collar on AmazonMartingale collars (aka. limited-slip collars) are great for dogs with slender necks (think Greyhound, Saluki, Whippet, etc.) that can easily dip out of a flat collar. The collar is designed by a length of material with rings at each end, and another length of material running through the rings. The leash is attached to a ring on the second length of material, and when your pup tries to slip out of his or her collar, the martingale tightens (only to the size of your dog’s neck when properly adjusted) to prevent their attempted escape. Read more about the martingale collar.

Head Collars

Premier Pet Gentle Leader Headcollar on AmazonHead collars are perfect for headstrong dogs, both those that are playful and those that just don’t know their strength, and reminiscent of a horse’s halter. One strap goes around your dog’s neck, just behind the ears, and the other around his muzzle. The leash attaches to the ring on the muzzle material. Head collars work by controlling your dog’s muzzle, and the amount of leverage (aka. pulling power) your pup has. Proper fit should be used and don’t hesitate to ask a trainer or sales clerk at your local pet store for fit tips.

Aversive Collar

Choke Collars

Platinum Pets Chain Dog CollarA choke collar looks like a thin chain, and works like a pinch collar in that it tightens according to the tension put on the leash. A choke collar works much like a rope looped through itself. When the leash is pulled tightly the collar pulls tightly around the dogs neck, causing it to choke itself and relax back into stride to loosen the tension. The choke and pinch/prong collars are not advisable for fragile-necked breeds, and are generally used with stronger, more aggressive breeds. For a deeper look at choke collars read our article on The Choke Collar.

Pinch/Prong Collars

The pinch collar, also known as the prong collar, is a metal collar made of various links which can be expanded or shortened by removing or adding an additional link. Each of the links in the collar has a set of prongs which sits against a dog’s skin until the dog puts tension on the leash, then the prongs pinch the dog’s neck to cause displeasure and thereby making him or her mind. For more, read our article on The Pinch Collar. The pinch collar also has a small silver ring to attach a dog’s leash and this ring sits on the back of the dog’s neck.

 No-Bark Collars

It’s important to note that while no-bark collars address the issue of barking itself, they do not address the root of barking. For an in-depth look at no-bark collars, read our article No Bark Dog Collar. For more insight as to why dogs bark, and the proper training methods to address it, check out Barking Bad: Why Dogs Bark and How To Stop It.

And here are a few no-bark dog collar options you can read more about:

  • Spray Collars: Spray collars work by spraying a non-toxic substance in the dog’s face when it senses that your dog is barking. In theory, your dog will get tired of being sprayed in the face every time he barks and will subsequently learn that no barking = no spraying. The citronella spray collar is considered the most humane of all the aversive collars. Read more about it in our Citronella Dog Collar article.
  • Sonic Collars: The sonic (aka. ultrasonic) collar has a device that sits against your dog’s throat, and when he barks, it detects the vibration and sends out a high-pitched noise, only detectable to your pup, to deter him from barking.
  • Shock Collars: Shock collars, like the sonic collars, have a device that sits next to your pup’s throat to detect when he begins barking. Only, instead of sending out a sound you can’t hear, it sends a shock to the back of his neck. There are several different shock levels you can use in increasing measure if your dog won’t stop barking. Unlike the sonic collar that is untestable because it’s undetectable to the human ear, you can test the shock collar against your own skin before using it on your pup. Learn more about Shock Collars for Dogs.

Types of Dog Leashes

While the best leash for you is ultimately the one that feels most comfortable in your hands, certain types of leashes are better for certain situations.

Regular Leashes

Flexi Leash

Flexi Explore Retractable Leash on AmazonThese extendable leads with their iconic plastic handles are a great option for walks in the park, field explorations, or basically anytime your pup has a little room to romp. We’d be wary of using this type of lead in heavy traffic, at a crowded park or anytime you need a have a little more control. Check out our Retractable Leash Reviews.

Leather or Nylon Leash

Lupine Dog Lead on AmazonWhether you choose leather or nylon, this straightforward style of lead with a loop on one end and a clip on the other, is a great all-around option. Whether you’re letting your pup out for a quick pee break or going out for a quick walk, everyone needs one of these leads. Generally speaking, leather is a little easier on you hands; nylon, while less expensive, can cause “rope burn” if pulled through your palms quickly. Most state and local parks request you use a leash of no more than 6 feet so you may wish to consider this when choosing the length.

Chain Leash

Chain leads may look pretty, but they’re heavy and even harsher on your hands than a standard nylon leash. They’re also not-so-great on your pup’s teeth, should he or she decide to play tug-of-war one day with the lead.

Specialty Leashes

Not all leads are created equal. Aside from your standard options, there some pretty fancy options out there. Whether you’re looking for a retract-into-the-collar gadget or a hands-off option for exercising, here are a few specialty, self-explanatory lead options and our favorites among those available for purchase today:

Video: How to Buy the Best Dog Collar or Harness

This 3-minute video from PetCo walks you through some additional tips on how to pick out the right type for your pup (no pun intended).

Don’t Risk Your Dog’s Life

Whether you opt for a simple set-up or one that’s more involved, the main thing is that you choose a collar and leash combo, period. It will not only make it easy for you to control your pup in group situations, but it’s also an effective training tool to teach your pup that they don’t always have to lead. Sometimes, it’s nice to just follow. It can also save your dog from running away or worse, being hit by a car as some 1.2 million dogs are every year (according to The Pet’s Tech). So better safe than sorry that your best friend is buckled up safely and securely.

The information contained in this article and website is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional safety advice; it is provided for educational purposes only.

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
Sara is a writer for Canine Journal. She adores dogs and recently adopted a rescue pup named Beamer. Whole she may be adjusting to life with another being to care for, she needed no time to adjust to all the extra love.

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4 Comments on "How to Pick the Best Dog Collars and Leashes For Your Dog"

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Michelle
Michelle

We tried the gel handle dog leash a few times and the handle is so big and heavy that you cannot shove it in your pocket when you are not using it (like I do with other leashes) and I would have to say it is not super comfy on your wrist (I prefer a regular leash feel in my hand). But, if you have a hard time getting a good hold on your dog’s leash, this might be a good solution (arthritis or other reasons) because the handle is very grippy.

Ben Proctor
Ben Proctor

My wife and I just bought a new dog and wanted to make sure we bought the right collar for her. When we got online we figured it would be simple to find one real quick, but we quickly found out that there is a ton of different types. I like that you went through each one and explained what the uses were for each one and what types of dogs they are good for. Your article was very informative and we know which type of collar to get so thank you for the advice.

Kimberly Alt
Kimberly Alt

Happy to hear we could help, Ben! Enjoy life with your new dog!

Jay Lim
Jay Lim

Great information and very useful article. I think dog lovers should know about it before they buy a collar for their furbaby. Mostly they don’t consider the function, so it would be a bad choice for s/he and of course for their dogs too.

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