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Pit Bull Facts and Why We Love This Breed

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Pit BullOver the decades dog lovers have read headline after headline positioning one breed or another as “dangerous.” Most recently the newest “fall dog” is the pit bull. This article and accompanying infographic will take a look at pit bull facts and just how accurate the label of “dangerous dog” fits the pit bull breed as a whole and look at the real facts behind bully breeds.

Pit Bull Facts Infographic

Pit Bull Infographic

What is the Difference between a Pit Bull and a Bully Breed?

The term “bully breed” is used to refer to a large group of various breeds of dog that hail from the same root breed. Dogs that belong to a bully breed are all derived from one particular type of dog known as the Molosser. The Molosser is an Ancient Greek breed that was characterized by a short muzzle, large bones, a large frame and pendant shaped ears. Originally Molossers were bred with a range of other dogs that resulted in varied breed characteristics found today in the various bully-type breeds. These dogs were bred as guardians of both property and livestock. These types of owners would use their dogs in sports like bull-baiting which many believe is how the term “bully breed” came about. Unfortunately, not all owners of these dogs today utilize them for their original purpose and recognized their potential as fighting dogs.

What Breeds are Bully Breeds?

The pit bull is just one breed that is categorized under the bully breed label. All the following breeds actually make up the bully breed category:

  • Alapaha blue blood bulldog
  • Ambullneo mastiff
  • American bulldog
  • American mastiff
  • American pit bull terrier
  • American Staffordshire terrier
  • Anatolian mastiff
  • Australian bulldog
  • Bantam bulldogge
  • Banter Bulldogge
  • Belgian mastiff
  • Boston terrier
  • Boxer
  • Buldogue campeiro
  • Bull terrier
  • Bulldog
  • Bullmastiff
  • Ca de bou
  • Cane corso
  • Catahoula bulldog
  • Dogo Argentino
  • Dogue de Bordeux
  • Dorset olde tyme bulldogge
  • English bulldog
  • Fila Brasileiro
  • French bulldog
  • Great Dane
  • Mastiff
  • Miniature bull terrier
  • Neopolitan mastiff
  • Olde Boston bulldogge
  • Olde English bulldog
  • Pug
  • Pyrenean mastiff
  • Renascence bulldogge
  • Rottweiler
  • Spanish mastiff
  • Staffordshire bull terrier
  • Standard bull terrier
  • Tibetan mastiff
  • Valley bulldog
  • Victorian bulldogge

As you can see from this extensive list, the American pit bull terrier is just one of many breeds. In fact, more than a handful of the breeds on this list surprise even the most anti-bully breed proponents.

Mischaracterization of the Pit Bull Breed

Looking over the list of bully breeds above many of these breeds are unknown to general dog lovers which is perhaps one reason why so many dogs are mischaracterized as pit bulls. While these breeds all share common ancestry and have common features such as the flatter shorter snout, being able to distinguish between different bully breeds is important. Without being able to separate one bully breed from another it is easy for pit bulls to be pinned as the “breed that bit that boy.” That is not to say that bully breeds in general are bad dogs, they just happen to be most frequently selected by bad owners. Did you know that currently just five percent of all of the dogs found across the United States are pit bulls? Over all there are approximately 78.2 million dogs throughout the United States, 3.91 million of those dogs are pit bulls. However, 40 percent of dogs in animal shelters are characterized as bully breeds and 20 percent of those are called pit bulls.

Misquoted Facts

The mischaracterization of all bull breeds as pit bulls is not the only area where pit bulls get the short end of the stick. Unfortunately as public opinion of this breed declines and the banning of bully breeds builds momentum, many more facts are turned around.

Myth: Pits Bite Harder than Other Dogs

Who hasn’t heard about the incredible amount of force exerted by the jaws of a pit bull? The amazing 1600 pounds per square inch that the pit bull is said to exert through their bite is actually just like many other breeds – around 235 pounds per square inch. What dog has the highest pounds per square inch bite force? The Rottweiler which measures in at 328 pounds per square inch of bite force. Even with this figure in mind though, does this mean that the Rottweiler is a dangerous breed? Not necessarily: It means that if a Rottweiler were to bite someone or something it could be capable of exerting 328 pounds per square inch of bite force. It does not mean that this dog will bite or that it will exert that much force with a bite. What this data could mean also is that if a dog does exert that much bite force, the resulting bite could be much more severe than a bite from a less powerful dog. And that means that bites from this type of dog are more likely to be reported than bites from smaller, less powerful dogs leading to a news reporting bias.

Pit Bulls Sure are Cute

No question these Pit puppies are adorable!

Are Pit Bulls Good Dogs?

Asking the question whether pit bulls are good dogs is the same as asking whether disadvantaged children are good children. A dog’s temperament depends on a variety of factors including breeding and upbringing (much like children.) What we do know from statistical analysis is that 86.8 percent of American pit bull terriers have passed their temperament testing according to the American Temperament Test Society, Inc. This is a higher number of American pit bulls to pass their testing than collies, beagles and even golden retrievers. Of 122 different canine breeds tested by the society, pit bulls ranked fourth for passing temperament testing. Pit bulls, like any other dogs, have the opportunity to be great dogs.

Are Fatal Pit Bull Attacks Common?

Turning on the news it seems like the only dog attacks that ever make headlines are attacks by pit bulls and attacks that result in death or serious injury. Few people take the time to learn the facts behind this type of breed; they simply take what they are fed by media news outlets. So just how common are fatal pit bull attacks? According to research an individual is 200 times more likely to die from taking over the counter aspirin than from a fatal pit bull attack. An individual is 60 times more likely to be killed by a falling coconut than they are to be killed by a pit bull attack. Additionally, a person is 16 times more likely to die by drowning in a five gallon bucket of water than they are to die as the result of a fatal pit bull attack. Yet how often do you hear of people dying from taking aspirin or from drowning in a bucket of water on the news? Many pit bull and bully breed haters are colored by this media reporting bias.

What Does This Media-Driven Bias Mean For Pit Bulls?

With such a bias against the pit bull breed and select bully breeds in general, how is the pit bull breed affected? Perhaps the biggest indicator of this is by taking a look at research from animal shelters around the nation. Approximately 60 percent of all dogs that are taken to shelters are euthanized each and every year. As we have already mentioned, of all of the dogs in animal shelters currently around 40 percent are classified as bully breeds and 20 percent are classified as pit bulls. Only 48 percent of the nation’s shelters place these pit bulls up for adoption, another 30 percent of shelters put these dogs up for adoption under special circumstances. Most disappointing, however, is the fact that 22 percent of the nation’s shelters euthanize dogs that are categorized as pit bulls regardless of the individual dog’s disposition. This practice of breed discrimination is wrong not only because perfectly healthy and happy dogs are being put to death because of their appearance, but also because they aren’t being given a chance due to ignorance and bias.

What Can Be Done to Help Pit Bulls and Bully Breeds?

If more people were familiar with the array of breeds within the bully breed category perhaps they would be less inclined to judge one particular bully breed as a “bad dog” — whoever heard of someone banning Boston terriers from an apartment complex because they were a bully breed? Judging a dog’s temperament by its appearance is like judging a person’s personality by the color of their skin, something one would hope humankind had learned from in our own history.

Advocate for Pit Bulls and Spread The Word

One of the best things that can be done to advocate for pit bulls and bully breeds is to spread the word about just how expansive the bully breed category is. Share with your friends about how the Boston terrier and Pug come from the same origin as the Neopolitan mastiff and the pit bull terrier. Encourage people not only to educate themselves about the difference between individual breeds but also about the sheer ridiculousness of judging an entire breed of dog based on a select few incidences that receive sensationalized media coverage. Ask people to stop and think when was the last time that they heard of a mixed breed dog bite fatality?

It is Not Okay to Minimize Pit Bull Bite Incidences

With all of these statistics under your belt it is important not to minimize pit bull bite incidences but it is important to also draw attention to the fact that there are a number of mitigating circumstances in these bite statistics. The truth is that people do get bitten by pit bulls, just as they get bitten by husky’s and German shepherds. It is possible however to become a proponent for pit bull terriers while also respecting incidences of pit bull bites. Encourage individuals with reservations about the pit bull breed to understand that not all dogs within a certain breed are bred to fight, that upbringing and good breeding can result in a wide range of dispositions. Many people have experiences that have colored their opinion of one dog breed or another but as a proponent for fair treatment of the pit bull breed it is important to make others aware of the fact that not all pit bulls are like “the one that bit that boy.”

Dog Liability Insurance May Save You Money and Your Dog’s Life

If you do want to better understand how you can protect yourself and your Pit from potentially risky situations, we recommend that you contact a dog liability insurance expert to gain some perspective on your options. 

InsureMyCanine logoIf you are interested in protecting yourself with dog liability insurance, visit our partner at InsureMyCanine.com to learn more and get a free quote.

What do you love about pit bulls?

Source: Wikipedia: Pit Bull

Disclaimer: Information regarding insurance company offerings, pricing and other contract details are subject to change by the insurance company at any time and are not under the control of this website. Information published on this website is intended for reference use only. Please review your policy carefully before signing up for a new pet health insurance contract or any other contract as your unique circumstances will differ from those of others who may be used for example purposes in this article.


About Sara Logan Wilson
Sara is a writer for Canine Journal. She adores dogs and recently adopted a rescue pup named Beamer. Whole she may be adjusting to life with another being to care for, she needed no time to adjust to all the extra love.
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58 Comments on "Pit Bull Facts and Why We Love This Breed"

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Jesse Roth
Jesse Roth
I’ve owned a pit bull for over 10 years from a juvenile to an adult and I’ve never had a problem. I now have 3 kids and own one. She is the most loyal, loving, and protective. She gets anxiety anytime one of us leaves the the house. She sleeps with my youngest and growls at me when i check on him before I leave for work until she knows who I am. She worries about anything that happens to one of my kids from coughing to yelling so she checks on them 24/7. Pit bull are the “Babysitter Breed”.… Read more »
Jesse Roth
Jesse Roth
Pitbulls get a bad rep, and it will continue. I’ve owned pitbulls for 10 years from my juvenile years to adult and never had an issue. I now have 3 kids and my dog is the most loyal & loving. She gets anxiety anytime one of us leave the house until we come back. Thats how attached to us she is. She is like a mother hen around the house. Anytime a kid is coughing or anything she is worried until she knows their fine. I would recommend a pitbull to any family with kids. They are protective and watchful.… Read more »
lizabeth flynn
lizabeth flynn

Does you pit bull do laundry and iron too? Or is growling at you when you check your child in the morning it’s primary nanny function? Get a real dog, they’re also protective of children, more so than pit bulls are but they don’t growl at parents nor snap and kill with warning or provocation like pits do.

Kimberly Alt
Admin
Kimberly Alt

What a sweet bond your family has with your dog. She sounds like such a sweetheart. Thanks for sharing your story with us! 🙂

James Papia
James Papia

According to Dogbite.org, which links this article, in 2016 there were 28 dog attack fatalities, 21 were attributed to pit bulls or pit bull mixes, 13 were children under 10 and 3 or 4 that aren’t yet a month old.

lizabeth flynn
lizabeth flynn

When a pit bull kills a person it is suddenly not a pit bull. When a pit bull licks the baby it is ALWAYS a pit bull. This is how to identify a pit bull according to the pit bull specialists which comprise 100% of the people who own pit bulls. They know everything about all other dog breeds too and throw every one of them under the bus when a pit bull kills a child….all dogs bite, all dogs can kill you. They are the experts of the entire dog breed world you know…….

Cindy Tesler
Cindy Tesler

Thanks for pointing out that 86.8% of pit bull terriers have passed their temperament tests. You also mention that there are 78.2 million dogs in the US. I think it’s a good idea to adopt a pit bull so that people everywhere can enjoy the breed.

fyi_im_me
fyi_im_me
Disregarding breed, breed traits and history when choosing a pet, and advocating that it is the home that determines the dog is both irresponsible and very uneducated. I disagree with breed specific legislation; however I respect the breeding of the animal. The traits a breed has are the result of years and years of breeding. That is a huge factor is whether or not a dog is in the correct setting. I currently have 4 dogs, all rehomes or rescues. All are the result of a wonderful animal in the wrong household. Pits are wonderful dogs with huge hearts, but… Read more »
Bob Smith
Bob Smith
There’s some terrible misuse of statistics in this article. While it may be true that, on average, one is more likely to be killed by coconuts or buckets of water, this is not an appropriate comparison. Of course it’s true that people who don’t own pit bulls have a vanishingly small risk of being bitten. However, the relevant statistic is the conditional probability of bite given that you have one of these dogs. To be totally clear, I’m not saying that pits are necessarily a high-risk dog. What I am saying is that we can’t make a determination one way… Read more »
Tristen Mclean
Tristen Mclean

Pit bull are my favorite dog breed they are not as bad as people think they are.

lizabeth flynn
lizabeth flynn

People think pit bulls are bad when their dog or child has been severely injured or killed by the lack of bite inhibition pit bulls have been bred for. They do far more damage when they attack than all other dog breeds combined. I’d say that’s not a good family pet. Beautifully raised pits have killed their owners or family members without a second’s warning, but I guess they remain a favorite for a sub-set of people who choose to ignore the truth about this breed.

Katlanmak
Katlanmak
My dog has been attacked by several different dogs in the past, including a German Shepherd that was significantly bigger than my dog. Shepherd left my dog alone as soon as mine laid down, with the other dogs it was easy to separate them, no blood was ever shed until my dog was attacked by a Staffordshire Bull Terrier that pinned himself to his neck and refused to let go. Owner had absolutely no idea how to get her dog to release despite being well aware of their special grip which she later told about while advocating for her breed.… Read more »
lizabeth flynn
lizabeth flynn
Excellent points you’ve made. I’m impressed that you grabbed your dog’s leash and choked the pit bull off of your dog, you saved your dog’s life as pits have been bred to lack bite inhibition and do not let go until they or their opponent die. Beating, stabbing and even shooting them won’t make them release their victim. This is why so many pit bulls are dumped off and crowding the shelters, when they mature the dog on dog aggression rears it’s ugly head and few are able to “control” them. The breed would be better off if there were… Read more »
Jesse Roth
Jesse Roth

Your post is vague, say what you really mean

Debbie Bell
Debbie Bell

Great post.

yuletak
yuletak
I think part of the problem is that people who get dogs don’t pay attention to the needs of the breed. Even if owners aren’t of the questionable character type, they may not be fulfilling the needs of their dogs. When these needs aren’t met, frustration gets pent up until it is released, and in pits, it could come out explosively and end with a very bad outcome. Again, this isn’t a fault of the breed, but it’s the owners who don’t fulfill the needs of the dog’s breed, even owners who mean well. Unfortunately, pits are so strong and… Read more »
Kimberly Alt
Admin
Kimberly Alt

Thank you for the comment. On this site we advocate for dogs. We love every breed and this article specifically is dedicated to pit bulls and why they’re so great. It’s ok if you disagree and we respect your opinion. We still stand by pits and think they can be great dogs like any other breed.

Debbie Bell
Debbie Bell

No one who is educated, sane, compassionate wants more dog killing dogs to be produced.

Kimberly Alt
Admin
Kimberly Alt

We consider ourselves to be educated, sane, compassionate people. That’s how we know that all pits do not kill dogs.

Andreas
Andreas

My pit bull got attacked by labrador and by chihuahua. She only pulled back without harming the dogs.

The owner was proud of how brave his dogs were to stand up on a vicious breed. Some people are just blind.

Quick fact that wasn’t mentioned, all the statistics are made on pit bulls. Pit bull has 6 breeds. Which means it was calculated 6 vs 1 breed. Example pit bull vs Doberman pincher. Keep that in mind when you read statistics. (Some may write pit bull types. Still fake results.)

Kim B
Kim B

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MEmijfYaPRg

“This idea that aggression can be traced back to specific breeds is the folklore of a criminal subculture. This is not an idea that exists in science.”

Learn. Educate yourselves!

Debbie Bell
Debbie Bell

Breed heritage doesn’t matter? Only some bully people say that.

So let pits mercifully become extinct. No one will miss them because breed doesn’t matter to bully people.

John Edward Schweitzer
John Edward Schweitzer

I just read about a five year old boy who was just mauled by two dogs. What breed of dog were they?

Megan Proffitt
Megan Proffitt
The media is saying pit bull, but pit bull or not the attacks were caused by bad parenting. The mother left her child alone with 2 dogs. That’s mistake one. Pit bulls are just like other animals. They won’t attack unless provoked. Considering this 5 year old was mauled tells me that he probably provoked the dogs. Which is mistake two. The 2 most common mistakes parents in USA make with kids and dogs is 1: leaving their child alone with the dog. No matter what breed all dogs are capable of mauling children, so don’t leave kids unsupervised with… Read more »
Debbie Bell
Debbie Bell

Good game insane pits must attack unprovoked and prolonged. That’s essential for winning dog fights.

yuletak
yuletak
My friend showed me this article. Who knows. Maybe they kind of looked like pit bulls, but there was a study done that showed even expert dog handlers have trouble consistently determining the breeds in mixed dogs. I’d venture a guess and say that roughly 70% of dogs in this country are mixed. Of course, one also has to question how accurate the DNA testing used to determine breeds is. I personally own a dog that has the physical attributes of an American pit bull terrier, but I was wrong with many of the test photos in the study. When… Read more »
Taylor Wall
Taylor Wall
I’ve seen good and bad pits and despite the amazing pits I’ve seen, I still think there needs to be stricter laws against these dogs. Not just pits but all bully breeds. One they attract bad owners. We all know it’s true don’t deny it. If you happen to be that type of trash there is no logic with you. Go look at how clean your house is before replying. Two the dogs cannot be physically stopped, either by hand or by foot, from 99.99% of humans. That means outside of some 400 lb body builder, you will get torn… Read more »
Kim B
Kim B
You sound very smart and educated, but you are ignorant, discriminatory, judgmental, obnoxious, and very arrogant. You obviously haven’t done anything more than “seen” pit bulls so what the heck do you think you are even remotely qualified to comment about pit bulls? Really, what do you base your ridiculous opinions on? You have taken what bad things you have heard on the news, info from isolated tragic incidences and let that flap around in your empty head…then, you spit out this nonsense. Go get a pit, raise it, and then you can say something that is close to the… Read more »
Jenny
Jenny
No, actually Taylor Wall brings up a good point. Dog breeds weren’t created for funsies, they were often bred for different work purposes. And it’s true that the pit bull was bred for protection. They were bred to be guard dogs, and guard dogs (and guard humans) are generally not afraid to protect by attacking if they perceive a threat. You don’t have to own a pit bull, or even a dog, to understand how this works. Additionally, just as one “bad” story does not make all pit bulls “bad,” one “good” story does not make all pit bulls “good.”… Read more »
pete
pete

Thank you Sara. Nice job on an educational article. I always enjoy reading an article backed up with facts rather than emotion.

Ramón
Ramón

Yeah, yeah, but, how many kids had been bitten to death by brakes and how many by pit bulls?

Ben

My dog was killed right in front of my eyes by a pit bull. Every day a child’s is killed or maimed by a Pit Bull. Statistics don’t matter when your dog or child is murdered by an irresponsible pit bull.
Stop breeding these animals!!!
It is indelibly written in their genes to be unpredictable and no one is fit enough to contain them when they are ready to attack. So continuing to spread this breed causes people to have to live in fear of stupid people who insist on putting other people in fear, terror, jeopardy and ultimately in anguish.

yuletak
yuletak

Not saying your dog did, but sometimes, the “victims” are the provokers. And please, where is the statistic that everyday a child is killed or maimed by a pit? In 2014, there were 42 total dog bite fatalities.

Kella
Kella

So you’re telling me my 2 year old pit bull is a killer? When she was ATTACKED by some little crazy dog and she didn’t fight back. Everyone and everything has the potential to be violent, but that doesn’t mean when they lash out they should be punished or killed. So you need to check your ignorance before you hurt someone.

bellaboo
bellaboo

Your ignorance is dangerous!

corey
corey

That’s because your dog was to weak to protect itself!

Gordon Shumway
Gordon Shumway

If 90% of alligators passed the aggression test I still wouldn’t let one babysit my kid.

redhouse
redhouse
Thank you! First off, the statistics presented in the article don’t help the pro pit bull argument. The fact that most of these dogs do pass the temperament test and are still the biggest culprits of human attacks means that you can just never tell with this breed. I’m not willing to play Russian roulette with a breed. Also, the statistic that this breed is only 5% of the dog population in the U.S. is quite damning since this breed tops the charts for bites, maulings, and fatalities. These dogs are strong and protective of their people. If they get… Read more »
Kim B
Kim B

They are not the “biggest culprits of human attacks” you dumby. They do not top the charts for bites, maulings and fatalities. They are protective just like a rotweiller, lab, german shepard and many other dogs…so?! And “they can’t be stopped”…what the heck, of course they can. Also, all dogs should be properly introduced and not just thrown together as if they aren’t animals. You are another example of someone who believes everything they read or hear. Get real and check the facts.

Jeremy
Jeremy
I’ve grown up around Pit bulls, and Bulldogs, My Pitt bull I grew up with was a Red-nose. We got him when he was a baby and taught him well. He was very gentle, and loved to lick our belly buttons because he was raised in an environment where being bad and violent was not okay and he knew that. My dad’s friend had a Alapaha blue blood bulldog. Her name was Sugar. They bought her when she was barely an adult. They found her and she was gentle at the time. But when they kept her she wasn’t nice… Read more »
yuletak
yuletak

Each dog’s temperament is different. Some dogs need more assertive handling than others. I don’t know how you handled your dogs, so it’s difficult to comment based on you having just “grown up around them.”

ilovemypitbull
ilovemypitbull

You people are missing the whole point of the article. As a pitbull owner, I applaud you for this article.

John
John

As a mail man who interacts with MANY different breeds every day, Pits are the ones I fear the most. They are more aggressive than any other dog I come across. When one of my coworkers gets attacked by a dog I never ask what breed it was. I already know it was a pit.

Brieana Patton
Brieana Patton

Most pitbulls are guard dogs guarding there owners who they love and any guard dog would attack if you get to close to their family.

Alan
Alan

And that’s ok, right?

be kind
be kind

On what planet are there “breeds” called “Ambullneo Mastiff” and “Dorset olde tyme bulldogge?” I don’t see them being recognized by the AKC or UKC or CKC. Some of this article appears accurate, but some of it needed a lot better fact-checking. When you sprinkle untruths in an article about a controversial subject, you give your enemies weapons to use against you. Thanks very much!

Michelle Schenker
Admin
Michelle Schenker

Hello,
The Ambullneo Mastiff and Dorset Olde Tyme Bulldogge are dog breeds and you can learn more about them on these two websites as well as others you can Google.

* http://ambullneo.net/
* http://www.bulldoginformation.com/Dorset-old-tyme-bulldog.html

Further, a dog being recognized by the AKC, UKC, CKC or other large-scale organization does not include all breeds that are recognized by dog owners. So our information includes all common “breeds”.

Casdog1
Casdog1

LOL at your list of “bully breeds”. The LGD breeds are not bully breeds & are not related to bully breeds. So sorry but Anatolian Shepherd Dogs (they are NOT called Anatolian Mastiffs, there is no such breed with that name), Pyrenean Mastiffs, Spanish Mastiffs, & Tibetan Mastiffs are NOT bully breed dogs. They’re livestock guardian breeds, & far more ancient than any of the much smaller bull & terrier breeds developed for hunting & bull baiting.

Carmella
Carmella
Pit bulls have a bad rap because of stupid people. Stupid people can teach any dog to be vicious, including a Yorkie. I'm sick of the rap that Pitts get. They are one of the dogs that most retarded politicians seem to want to put down. And furthermore the media saying they are bad. But other dogs like Pomeranians, Yorkies, or Scottish Terriers don't and they bite more then Pitts for no reason. Why aren't they put down? Why doesn't the media do segments on them? Why don't politicians do anything about them? Oh yeah, that's right. Rich people have these… Read more »
Debbie Bell
Debbie Bell

Pomeranians, Yorkies, or Scottish Terriers aren’t killing dogs in the ways and numbers pits are.

Ben

So you hate small dogs and if they get bit by your pit bull and die they deserve it because they are brat dogs and you hate rich people? Do you have guns too?

charles
charles

Wow jumping to a gun thing. That is ignorant. And I used to live in the ghetto where pits were used for protection. And as for not being man or woman enough to take them on. In a situation of either you or me, I’m not going out easy or at all.

Ben

Problem is an owner can control a Yorkie. No one is woman or man enough to stop one of these creatures when they are ready to attack.

kevin
kevin

That statement is the most ignorant comment I have ever heard. You obviously have no knowledge of training or knowing anything about dog handling!

Brieana Patton
Brieana Patton

I am 14 years old and I can control my 145 lb pit bull by using a calm tone most people yell at them and they take your energy and convert it to bad energy. It’s like yelling at a baby you get loud and they’ll get loud in the end you’ll get nowhere so educate before you discriminate.

Catherine Chandler
Catherine Chandler

If your dog gets triggered by something, no, you will not be able to control it with a calm tone. You are fooling yourself.

Debbie Bell
Debbie Bell

You obviously haven’t seen a good game insane pit attack.

If you compare your bully to a human baby, then your bully isn’t a good game insane pit.

corey
corey

The only reason pits attack smaller dogs is because they are provoked by those stupid little ankle biters. So anything that triggers them will be in danger but the problems are idiot getting these dogs without know a thing about them. Remember an angry pitbull can pull over 30 times it’s own body weight.

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