Rottweiler: Is it the Right Breed for You?

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Rottweiler laying in grassRottweilers are thought of as being one of the most dangerous dogs, but with proper training, they can be one of the most loyal and affectionate breeds. You could be the perfect family to take a Rottweiler in and show them unconditional love. They enjoy exercise and are incredibly beautiful with their black fur and brown markings. Learn more about this amazing breed below.

The History of Rottweilers

The AKC recognized Rottweilers in 1931, and they are the 8th most popular dog breed. Unfortunately, their origin is not documented, but it is believed that they are most likely descended from ancient Rome. They were originally “drovers,” which means their job was to protect livestock. In the early 1900’s Rottweilers were used as police dogs.

Rottweiler Appearance

Rottweilers are medium to large size dogs with males reaching 24 to 27 inches and females 22 to 25 inches in height. Males weigh 110 to 130 pounds on average and females 77 to 110 pounds. Their coats are black with rust, mahogany or tan markings and are straight, coarse, dense and medium length. They need occasional grooming and experience seasonal shedding. Rottweilers should have docked tails.

How Healthy Are Rottweilers?

The majority of Rottweilers are healthy and have a lifespan of 8-12 years; however, some do experience some health problems. These illnesses include:

  • Hip and elbow dysplasia
  • Vision and eye problems including progressive retinal atrophy, cataracts, eyelid deformities and more
  • Bleeding disorders including Von Willebrand’s disease
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Addison’s disease
  • Gastroenteritis
  • Folliculitis
  • Heart defects including cardiomyopathy, subaortic stenosis and more
  • Cancer
  • Canine bloat

The Temperament of Rottweilers

Rottweilers are people dogs and are affectionate and loyal toward their families. They tend to follow their favorite person from room to room, so they are always within eyesight. They are good with children and other dogs, but should still be supervised. A fenced yard is better than a kennel environment, and they shouldn’t be chained or tied for extended periods of time. This is because they do not do well in isolation and can develop unpleasant traits. These are social dogs and should be around people and other dogs if possible. They are capable of destructive behavior which could be due to boredom or anxiety. Rottweilers bark when necessary and can be reserved around strangers. Rotties are sensitive due to their intelligence and close attachment to their family. However, many liability insurance companies will not cover Rottweilers because they are considered a “bad breed.” Learn more about dog liability insurance.

How Much Exercise Do Rottweilers Need?

Rottweilers are medium to high energy dogs, and it is recommended to give them two workouts daily. (Perhaps you could do a short walk in the morning and a long walk in the evening.) Rottweilers can be extremely playful, so it’s a good idea to have some doggie toys around the house.

Are Rottweilers Smart?

Rottweilers are one of the ten smartest dog breeds. They respond well to training and is encouraged to get them the proper training needed to be a companion dog.

Funny Rottweilers

This compilation of Rottweilers is priceless. My favorite is the Rottie sitting on the ottoman watching TV.

You May Not Know This About Rotties

Rottweilers are beautiful dogs and can be great companion animals if trained properly. It’s important to know ahead of time that Rottweilers are among the most expensive dogs due to the training needed and the cost of initially adopting one. However, they are great family members and are considered to be great guard dogs for families as well.

Do you have a Rottweiler or are you thinking about getting one? What do you love most about this breed?

Growing up, Kimberly used to get the sniffles when she was around dogs. Thankfully, she grew out of her allergy and is now able to play and snuggle with dogs as much as she wants! She adopted Sally, a four-year-old hound mix, in early 2017, and at the end of 2017 she adopted Kopa, a one-year-old treeing walker coonhound. She and her husband are loving life as pet parents.

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1 Comment on "Rottweiler: Is it the Right Breed for You?"

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Crystal
Crystal
I have a Rottweiler and she’s the sweetest most loving animal ever, they often get a bad reputation for being bad dogs but that’s so not true!
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